Microsoft Project 2013 Plain & Simple by Ben Howard


8656cd2beca4083.jpg Author Ben Howard
Isbn 9780735671997
File size 27.8 MB
Year 2013
Pages 240
Language English
File format PDF
Category information technologies


 

Microsoft Project 2013 Plain & Simple Ben Howard Published with the authorization of Microsoft Corporation by: O’Reilly Media, Inc. 1005 Gravenstein Highway North Sebastopol, California 95472 Copyright © 2013 by Applepark Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. ISBN: 978-0-7356-7199-7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 QG 8 7 6 5 4 3 Printed and bound in the United States of America. Microsoft Press books are available through booksellers and distributors worldwide. If you need support related to this book, email Microsoft Press Book Support at [email protected] Please tell us what you think of this book at http://www. microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey. Microsoft and the trademarks listed at http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/en/us/IntellectualProperty/Trademarks/EN-US.aspx are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies. All other marks are property of their respective owners. The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, email addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, email address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred. This book expresses the author’s views and opinions. The information contained in this book is provided without any express, statutory, or implied warranties. Neither the authors, O’Reilly Media, Inc., Microsoft Corporation, nor its resellers, or distributors will be held liable for any damages caused or alleged to be caused either directly or indirectly by this book. Acquisitions and Developmental Editor: Kenyon Brown Production Editor: Melanie Yarbrough Editorial Production: Box Twelve Communications Technical Reviewer: Ellen Lehnert Copyeditor: nSight, Inc. Indexer: Judith McConville Cover Design: Twist Creative • Seattle Cover Composition: Karen Montgomery Illustrator: Kara Ebrahim For Andrea, Libby, and Maria Contents Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi 1 About this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 No computerese!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 A quick overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 A few assumptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 What’s new in Project 2013?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Using a touch-enabled system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 A final few words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 Getting started with Project 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Understanding Project terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Understanding the Backstage view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Adding commands to the ribbon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Collapsing and pinning the ribbon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Understanding views, tables, filters, and groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Selecting a different view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Displaying the View Bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Displaying a different table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Contents  v Selecting a different filter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Selecting a different group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Working with and inserting columns in a table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Hiding a column. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Moving a column. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Resizing a column. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Saving a modified view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Displaying the Project Summary Task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3 Getting the Project basics right. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Assigning a different calendar as the Project Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Setting the calendar’s working week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Defining public and organizational holidays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Defining the calendar options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Entering the project start date. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Setting the project properties and basic options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Setting the project currency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Changing the default view and date format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Saving the project to a local drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Saving the project to SkyDrive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Saving the project to Project Server 2013 or Project Online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Saving and synchronizing the project to SharePoint 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 vi Contents 4 Creating and modifying tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Understanding and setting the schedule mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Entering tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Indenting tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Outdenting tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Inserting new tasks into the schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Moving tasks around the schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Moving summary tasks around the schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Deleting tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 5 Setting estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Entering duration estimates for detail tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Entering duration estimates for summary tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Entering work estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Marking tasks that need an estimation review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 6 Linking the tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Linking dependent tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Changing the dependency type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Unlinking tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Adding a lag or lead time to a dependency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Displaying task paths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Contents  vii 7 Assigning and managing resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Creating work resources quickly in the Gantt Chart view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Creating resources using the Resource Sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Modifying resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Changing the maximum units for a resource. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Changing a resource’s working day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Entering resource holidays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Assigning a single work resource to a task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Assigning multiple work resources to a task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Adjusting the work, duration, and assignment units for a task. . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Assigning material resources to a task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Assigning cost resources to a task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Resolving overallocated resources using the Task Inspector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Resolving overallocated resources using the Team Planner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Deleting resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 8 Adding external dependencies and deadlines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Adding a deadline to a task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Changing a start or finish date for manually scheduled tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Adding external dependencies for auto scheduled tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Adding a specific calendar to a task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Planning for tasks that might not happen! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 viii Contents 9 Communicating the plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Formatting the table area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Formatting individual bars or a selection of bars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Formatting all the bars at once. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Viewing the Task Path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Displaying the critical path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Showing and hiding dependency links. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Viewing and printing the Project Overview report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Viewing and copying burndown reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Printing the project schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Using Visual Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Using the Timeline view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Formatting the Timeline view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Copying the Timeline view to other applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Printing the Timeline view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Sharing the plan using SharePoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Synchronizing with a SharePoint task list. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Emailing the project schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 10 Updating and replanning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Setting a baseline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Clearing a baseline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Updating an existing baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Rescheduling the entire plan to start on a new date. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Updating %Complete for individual tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Contents  ix Updating %Work Complete for specific tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Setting and displaying the Status Date. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Updating %Complete for the entire project at once . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Updating tasks with Actual Start, Actual Duration, and Remaining Duration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Updating tasks with actual work done per period and remaining work. . . . . 192 Rescheduling uncompleted work to a future date. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Moving tasks forward or backward in the schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Amending remaining duration and work estimates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 11 Closing the project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Setting any remaining duration or work to zero. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Setting milestones to 100% complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Inactivating unnecessary tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Comparing the final schedule to the baseline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Comparing different project versions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Saving a plan as a template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 x Contents Acknowledgments Many thanks to Kenyon Brown for giving me the opportunity to write this book; Melanie Yarbrough for guiding the book through production; and copy editor Chris Norton and many others in the extended O’Reilly team for their ability to turn my jumble of words into something worthy of publishing. Finally, a big thanks goes to Ellen Lehnert for her excellent technical review. Acknowledgments  xi About this book 1 In this section: I f you’ve opened this book and have started reading this paragraph, chances are that you’re running a project, or you have one to run, and you’re interested in learning how to use Microsoft Project 2013 to help you manage it. You might already have had some experience using Project, either this version or an earlier one, or you might have used a tool such as Microsoft Excel to create a task list and produce a Gantt chart and this is your first experience of Project. It could be that you’ve seen other people using Project in a way that has saved them time, allowed them to accurately track their projects, and enabled them to produce professionallooking reports. Whatever has drawn you to this book, Microsoft Project 2013 Plain & Simple, I’ve written it in a way that explains how to set up, track, and report on a project, allowing you to get to work immediately. My goal in writing this book was two-fold. First, for users who have never used Project before, I wanted to provide a concise and simple way to build a project schedule that puts them in control. Second, for users who have used Project before, I wanted to unravel some of the complexities associated with using it by providing clear and concise instructions to perform specific tasks. ■■ No computerese! ■■ A quick overview ■■ A few assumptions ■■ What’s new in Project 2013? ■■ Using a touch-enabled system ■■ A final few words 1: About this book No computerese! This is a book about Project and how to begin to get the most out of it. No task in this book makes you read more than two pages to find an answer to your question. Look up what you need to do in the table of contents or index, follow the steps in the task, and you’re done. If there are several ways to achieve the same goal (and often there are in Project), I’ll try to list them and then show you step by step how to achieve the goal, using one of the methods listed. Often there isn’t always a right way or a wrong way of achieving a task, and one of my continual delights of Project is finding a different way to achieve the same outcome. A large part of the success of working with Project lies in setting up the right view of the data, at the right time, in order to complete your task. Because this is a recurring theme, I vary the steps used to set up the view. I want to ensure that you are not afraid to explore and use Project to its full potential! Like many (or all) Microsoft products, Project comes with its own set of terms and concepts. In several sections I’ve taken the opportunity to expand on and explain the terms and concepts, where relevant, in order to help you get the most out of Project. A project plan, or schedule, is just a model, or representation, of the actual project you are going to run. Projects vary in length from days to years, from the simple to the complex. What you decide to build using Project depends very much on exactly what information you need to track and manage. For this book I build a project plan for creating a new product, and the same plan gets added to during each section. The plan is based upon a real project, so you can be sure that everything you see in this book is tried and tested in real life. 2  No computerese! When starting to use Project, it can appear to be a complex and daunting tool. When writing the book and taking the screen shots, I used all of the default settings, so what you see in the screen shots, and the steps I describe, will be the ones that you will perform to achieve the same goal. The screen shots were taken at a resolution of 1024 × 768, so because Project will resize the icons on the ribbon for different screen resolutions, your ribbon might be slightly different. With this release of Project, there are now three different versions of Project. Project Standard and Project Professional are the two base versions, and differ slightly in some additional functionality (these differences are noted in the book where applicable). Project Pro for Office 365 is the same software as Project Professional 2013, it is just licensed and distributed via a subscription service. You can find your version by accessing the Account tab within the Backstage area. This book is based on Microsoft Project 2013 Professional installed on the Microsoft Windows 7 operating system, but if you are using Windows 8, you’ll find that everything works just the same. I’ve tried to create as many Tips as possible, simply because the more you know about a tool, the quicker you become the master of it. I’ve also added in a few Cautions to keep you on the right track and the occasional See Also. 1: About this book A quick overview The sections in this book are organized logically for the types of tasks you’ll want to achieve or perform using Project. If you are new to Project, you can start at the beginning and work your way through the relevant sections for your project. If you’ve used Project before but just want to brush up on some techniques or find the easiest way to accomplish something, then just browse the relevant section or task and get started. Every project, from the simplest to the most complex, follows a basic “project life cycle.” During different phases of the life cycle, you use different features of Project to enable you to run your project as smoothly and efficiently as possible. The sections in this book, and the ordering of the sections, are based loosely on the project life cycle shown in the diagram. Section 3, “Getting the Project basics right,” talks you through some fundamental settings that you should think about and set before you start building your plan. Doing this before you create the tasks will save a lot of heartache later on. Once these items are set, you’re good to save the plan. Section 2, entitled “Getting started with Project 2013,” helps you understand some of the terms used in Project, how to navigate and use the interface, and how to change the interface so that the data displayed is exactly what you need to have displayed. As someone who is running a project, you might be spending a lot of time using Project, so it makes sense to learn your way around it. A quick overview  3 1: About this book Section 4, “Creating and modifying tasks,” teaches you how to create and build a complete “Work Breakdown Structure” fully representing all of the tasks you need to perform in order to complete the project. Section 5, “Setting estimates,” discusses the difference between duration and work and how to set and enter estimates for each task. Providing realistic and defensible estimates for tasks ensures that you will have a realistic chance of achieving them. Section 6, “Linking the tasks,” helps you understand how to link tasks together so that you can set the correct order in which the tasks need to be completed. Once tasks are sequenced together, it’s possible to view the task path and determine how long the whole project will take. Section 7, “Assigning and managing resources,” discusses what types of resources you can use in Project, how to create them, and how to assign them to tasks. Project uses three types of resources: Work, Material, and Cost. Section 8, “Adding external dependencies and deadlines,” helps you apply and review the consequences of any items that can affect your project but are outside of your control. 4  A quick overview 1: About this book Section 9, “Communicating the plan,” is all about producing great looking reports and presentations right out of Project. Producing a monthly status report has never been so easy. Section 11, “Closing the project,” works through what to do at the end of the project. Is everything complete? What lessons can you learn from this project? Can you use the project as a template to make the next project better? Section 10, “Updating and replanning,” deals with how to track the progress of the project. When you know what you need to do and you track what you actually did, you have a pretty good idea of what remains. A quick overview  5 1: About this book A few assumptions Using a touch-enabled system When I run training courses on Project, I assume my delegates are computer literate and willing to learn—nothing else. They are attending a training course to learn how to use Project, and so they are either currently running a project or have been given the opportunity to run one. The majority of people I train don’t have the job title of “Project Manager.” Often they are doing other jobs that involve an element of project management, from an office move to an IT implementation, an engineering project to building a school. I can’t begin to classify the different types of industries or the varieties of projects I’ve seen, talked about, and ultimately (in a small way) helped plan during those courses. I’ve assumed the readers of this book fall into that category. In this book I provide instructions based on traditional keyboard and mouse input methods. If you’re using Project on a touchenabled device, you might be giving commands by tapping with your finger or with a stylus. If so, substitute a tapping action any time I instruct you to click a user interface element. Also note that when I tell you to enter information in Project, you can do so by typing on a keyboard, tapping in the entry field under discussion to display and use the onscreen keyboard or even speaking aloud, depending on your computer setup and your personal preferences. What’s new in Project 2013? Project 2013 builds on the new features that were introduced in Project 2010, namely the ribbon and manually scheduled tasks. Microsoft didn’t stand still, though, and completely rewrote the reporting within this version (removing the reports that first appeared in the very earliest versions of Project). They also provided some additional nifty features, such as the ability to easily see the sequence of tasks through the project. Along with the rest of the Microsoft Office products, Project now integrates seamlessly with your Microsoft account, letting you save documents to your SkyDrive or, if you have one, you can synchronize tasks to a Microsoft SharePoint server task list, providing easy collaboration within a project team no matter how geographically dispersed they are. Finally, if you are using Windows 8 and a touch device, you can begin to let your fingers do the talking. A final few words I hope you find this book both informative and helpful; I wrote it because I’ve met many people who struggled with Project and I wanted to demystify the art of using it. I think Project is a fabulous tool, and I hope that by using this book you will too. 6  A few assumptions

Author Ben Howard Isbn 9780735671997 File size 27.8 MB Year 2013 Pages 240 Language English File format PDF Category Information Technologies Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Get the full-color, visual guide that makes learning Microsoft Project 2013 plain and simple! Follow the book’s easy steps and screenshots and clear, concise language to learn the simplest ways to effectively manage all your projects. Here’s WHAT you’ll learn: Develop a project plan and schedule resources Pull together your team and plan their assignments Understand dependencies and mitigate risks Stay on top of progress, delays, and costs Make adjustments and updates quickly Communicate with clear, customized reports     Download (27.8 MB) Microsoft Lync 2013 Plain & Simple Word 2013 For Dummies Microsoft Sharepoint 2013 Plain & Simple Microsoft Project 2013: The Missing Manual New Perspectives On Microsoft Office 2013, First Course Load more posts

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