DIY Dye: Bright and Funky Temporary Hair Coloring You Do at Home by Loren Lankford


0041ab16_medium.jpeg Author Loren Lankford
Isbn 9781612432809
File size 7MB
Year 2014
Pages 128
Language English
File format PDF
Category hobbies



 

DIY DYE BRIGHT AND FUNKY TEMPORARY HAIR COLORING YOU DO AT HOME LOREN LANKFORD PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON HOFMANN 1 Text copyright © 2013 Loren Lankford. Design and concept copyright © 2013 Ulysses Press and its licensors. Photographs copyright © 2013 Jason Hofmann except as noted below. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher, nor be otherwise circulated in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. Published in the U.S. by  Ulysses Press P.O. Box 3440 Berkeley, CA 94703 www.ulyssespress.com ISBN: 978-1-61243-280-9 Library of Congress Control Number 2013947585 Printed in the United States by Bang Printing 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Acquisitions Editor: Katherine Furman Editor: Melanie Gold Proofreader: Mary Hern Design and layout: Ashley Prine Indexer: Jay Kreider, J S Editorial Cover photographs: yellow hair © vita khorzhevska/shutterstock.com; pink hair © Aleksandar Bozhikov/shutterstock.com; green hair © Aleksandar Bozhikov/shutterstock.com; purple hair © Tawin Mukdharakosa/shutterstock.com; red hair © Subbotina Anna/shutterstock. com; orange tube dye © r3rn/shutterstock.com; chalk © tuchkay/shutterstock.com; purple brush © Jason Hofmann/shutterstock.com. Interior photographs: © Jason Hofmann except pages 4–5, 30–31 © veralub/shutterstock.com; pages 16–17 © Eldad Carin/shutterstock. com; pages 24–25 © Danylo Staroshchuk/shutterstock.com; page 37 © haveseen/shutterstock.com; pages 38–39 © RLN/shutterstock. com; pages 44–45 © art_of_sun/shutterstock.com; pages 54–55 © oriontrail/shutterstock.com; pages 60–61 © Subbotina Anna/ shutterstock.com; page 67 © GVictoria/shutterstock.com; page 77 lemon © Chrstian Jung/shutterstock.com, chamomile © Picsfive/ shutterstock.com, and cinnamon © B. and E. Dudzinscy/shutterstock.com. Distributed by Publishers Group West IMPORTANT NOTE TO READERS: This book is independently authored and published and no sponsorship or endorsement of this book by, and no affiliation with, any celebrities, trademarked brands or other products mentioned or pictured within is claimed or suggested. All trademarks that appear in directions, photographs, and elsewhere in this book belong to their respective owners and are used here for informational purposes only. The author and publisher encourage readers to patronize the quality brands and products mentioned and pictured in this book. 2 CONTENTS INTRODUCTION........................................................................ 5 GET READY............................................6 MATERIALS.............................................................................. 7 COLOR WHEEL—BASE COLOR.................................................... 7 THE BLEACH SPEECH................................................................. 8 A WORD OF CAUTION................................................................. 9 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE DYEING.................................... 9 THE DYES............................................. 11 BLEACH RECIPE AND TECHNIQUES........................................... 12 HAIR CHALKING RECIPES AND TECHNIQUES............................. 18 KOOL-AID RECIPE AND TECHNIQUES........................................ 23 COLORED-HAIRSPRAY TECHNIQUES......................................... 30 HENNA RECIPES AND TECHNIQUES .......................................... 36 FOOD-COLORING RECIPES AND TECHNIQUES........................... 44 STORE-BOUGHT COLORING TECHNIQUES................................. 49 DIY STYLE............................................ 56 FULL HEAD............................................................................. 57 STREAKS, HIGHLIGHTS, AND LOWLIGHTS................................. 61 OMBRE.................................................................................. 67 JUST THE TIPS.......................................................................... 71 TWO-TONE............................................................................. 74 3 RAINBOW............................................................................... 78 INDEX.................................................................................... 83 ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS..................................................... 86 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS............................................................. 86 4 INTRODUCTION It’s crazy to think that there are people in this world (tons of them!) who have “virgin hair,” meaning they’ve never used dye. There are also tons of people who only use dye to enhance the shade they naturally have. Many of these gals and guys were born with “dishwater blond” or “mousy brunette” hair and get highlights or lowlights or some mix of the two in order to take things up a notch. And then there’s me. If you can find the shade on a color wheel, my hair has been there. Throughout middle school and high school my hair was every color from green to pink to highlighter yellow to purple to black and every combination in between. I used Manic Panic hair paint and was actually thrilled to find out that the chlorine in the pool where I worked would turn my hair the fiercest shade of puke green (forgive me, hair gods! I knew not what I wrought). I did it because choosing to dye your hair—and in what ways—says a lot about your personality and the kind of image of yourself you want to project to the world. Much like your fashion choices or preferred makeup style describe you to those around you, your hair color and the way it is laid out might say that you’re a fiery redhead at heart or a wannabe blonde. You don’t have to be quite as experimental as my sixteen-year-old self in order to dabble with dyeing your hair. No matter where you fall along the spectrum and whether you dye at home or at a salon, there are hundreds of different ways to enhance your look. Worried about screwing up? Try to remember that it’s just hair—you can redo it or a stylist can work magic on it, and if nothing else, it’ll grow back! If I could attend my first movie premiere with (accidental) gray hair, you can overcome your mistakes as well. 5 GET READY BEFORE YOU START CANDY-COATING YOUR LOCKS, THERE ARE A FEW THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW. 6 MATERIALS Obviously there are different materials you will need for each specific type of dye and style, but here are the things you’ll need on hand no matter how you choose to dye: • Painting clothes, like an old T-shirt and pants (to wear while you dye) • Rubber gloves • Hairbrush or comb COLOR WHEEL—BASE COLOR If you have blond or light hair, you’ve basically hit the hair-dye jackpot. Any color that you want to use (purple, red, black, etc.) will dye well right onto your current palette after using a toner. That’s the key. The lighter your hair color is after using a toner, the more vibrant the color will show up. Dyeing right on top of gray hair will also get you super-vibrant results. Think of it like this: You have a piece of white paper and crayons. When you draw red on the paper, it comes up . . . well, really red! But if you then take a brown piece of construction paper and put it on the red, you’re not just going to get brown—you’re going to get a marriage of the two! So, depending on the color you want, you must consider your current color and how the two will mix. That’s why it’s important to remember the color wheel you learned as a kid in art class. If you’re trying to go bright red and you put that over yellow, your hair will be orange. If you put blue on yellow, your hair will turn green. If you’re a brunette and you want to dye your hair purple, using purple dye directly on your brunette hair will show up as burgundy and might not have quite the effect you want (unless what you want is a faint, darker tone). For color that is vibrant and lasting, bleach your hair first. The same goes for those of you who have super-dark hair. You’re going to have to do the most 7 work to get a really bright shade of any funky colors like red, purple, pink, or green. You will need to use bleach, not high lift color, and in doing so run the risk of damaging your hair, so use a protein treatment beforehand. If you’re feeling a little nervous about going blonde on your own, you may want to have a professional get you there so you have a nice blank canvas to put some bright colors on. An alternative for dyeing dark hair is to use a color treatment that sits on top of your natural color. Chalks and colored hairsprays don’t actually dye your hair. Instead they coat it and will show up beautifully on any color of locks. The only downside (or upside, depending on what you’re looking for) is that the color will come out in one wash. The upside is you can color-coordinate to your outfits every day! Much more on these later. DIY Definitions TONER Hair toner is the ultimate in hair revitalization. By putting tons of nourishment right into your strands, it works to correct and heal damaged hair including split ends, brittle strands, and any scalp itchiness caused by loads of dyeing or product use. The nutrients create a whole host of good results, including strength and vitality, promoting hair growth and getting your hair back to a stage where it can be chemically treated without doing as much damage. THE BLEACH SPEECH The darker your hair, the longer the bleach will need to stay on, and you’ll want to keep a watchful eye on it. Once your hair is coated in bleach, it will take from ten minutes to half an hour, depending on how dark your hair is and how light you want to go, for you to reach platinum blond. You’ll notice your hair turning orange, but don’t freak out and wash it out! Leave it in and it will continue to bleach lighter. For jet-black hair, you may need to bleach twice to achieve the effect you want. If you do find yourself needing to bleach twice or rebleach, it’s best to wait approximately thirty-six hours between bleachings. If you do make the bleach leap, be sure to wait at least a week after going to the light side before you throw the purple on top. Hair is fairly delicate, and you want to try to keep it healthy, especially if you plan to continue experimenting with dye in the future. (See pages 19–23 for instructions on using bleach with caution.) Of course, when using something as strong as bleach, you always run the risk that the end result will come out too orange-y or yellowish no matter what you do. If this happens, your best bet is to deep-condition and use a semi-permanent color in a red tone. The red will take the orange to mahogany. Remember that previously dyed hair and virgin hair will usually show slightly different results with regard to the vibrancy of the shade. It’s also good to note that things like skin tone and eye color affect the overall look of hair color. When you look at a photo of a model and think, Oh! I want her 8 hair!, simply buying the same shade doesn’t guarantee it’ll come out looking the same for you. DIY Definitions  HIGH LIFT COLOR High lift tint works a lot like bleach, without all the added drying out and stripping of the hair. Which probably leaves you thinking, If it’s better, why don’t people use it as often? Well, it’s not nearly as strong and is usually only used on virgin hair. Categorized as a level ten or higher, high lift tint can help you become the lightest version of the color you already have. If it’ll work for you, use it! It also works as a toner, which can help eliminate one step of the process. Blondes and light brunettes, give it a try, especially if you want highlights or lowlights. Everyone else, it’s bleach for you, my friend. Remember that bleach only removes color, it doesn’t add anything in. High lift, often seen in boxed colors, works with what you’ve got. A WORD OF CAUTION It’s important to wear clothes and use towels that you don’t mind getting dye on. It’s best to work with your hair in the bathroom and cover the area with old towels or sheets in case of splattering. You should also immediately clean up your workspace, so than any errant dye is wiped up right away, when it’s more likely to come off your counter, bathtub, or sink. Use bleach where needed. Likewise, if you accidently get dye on your forehead or earlobes while you work, it’s best to tend to it right away while it’s fresh. For the first few nights after you dye, it’s also a good idea to place a towel over your pillowcase. Your hair will likely “bleed” until you’ve washed it a few times. WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE DYEING Different colors have different life expectancies, tendencies, and quirks. Here are tips on what you might get from some of the major hues. RED / PINK Note that pink hair color fades fast—even faster than red, which fades to pink pretty fast. You can keep pink in longer by not shampooing your hair very often and mixing some Manic Panic into your conditioner when you do wash. Without doing either of these, your pink will quickly fade to a pastel and then totally disappear within a few weeks. If you want to keep it around long term, you’ll have to keep on dyeing! BLUE / PURPLE Like with many “loud” colors, one of the smartest things you can do to keep blue or purple going is shampooing your hair less often. You can also try to stick to only conditioning your tips, unless your hair just gets super oily (in which case feel free to condition all over every 3 days). It also helps to use a color-refreshing shampoo a few times a week, especially if you have particularly dry hair. 9 GREEN Again, you’ll want to wash your hair less often and try to use the coldest water possible. For a unique green color, you can try mixing different shades of green or adding in some blue to the mix. Avoid highly chlorinated pools or high sun exposure, as this will drain the color. To keep your color up, touch up any problematic or light areas every 2–4 weeks. YELLOW / ORANGE So, you want your hair the color most people who spend their time trying to go blonde totally dread. You’ll dye the same way you do blonde, bleaching until white and then dyeing on top of that. However, you can worry less if you have trouble getting totally blonde. Skip the toner and conditioners at first and just dye on however blonde you can get, and then once your dye has set, you can always tone to sharpen the color if you aren’t happy. 10 THE DYES FROM HOME-GROWN TO STORE-BOUGHT, HERE ARE ALL THE BEST CONCOCTIONS TO GET HAIR “TO DYE FOR.” 11 BLEACH RECIPE AND TECHNIQUES Since bleaching may be the first step toward your ultimate new hue, let’s talk about it first. Bleaching your hair is among the most intense things you can do to your mane. It’s easy to mess it up, and the components are often harsh and can cause your hair to become super-brittle or damaged. While bleaching is a common practice at salons and among professional hair stylists, bleaching at home requires thorough research and a solid skill set to pull off correctly. While many DIY hair gurus would go ahead and just advise you to head to a salon to go blond before attempting something on top of your new white ’do, I want to show you healthy-haired ladies the safest way out there to achieve the look you’re going for at home. Since so many colors pop better with a blond base (red, pink, and blue come to mind), it’s no wonder it’s a popular technique to try out. To go the home route, you’ll need a professional-grade bottle of bleach and developer. I recommend going with a 30, as using anything higher can lead to major mistakes. You don’t want to dye your hair only to find it falling out afterward! Scary, but it happens. I’d also recommend not skimping on the brands here. You’re already saving money by doing it yourself, so wait until you have the cash (about $50, normally) to get some good stuff. Ask your local beauty store employee what the best-selling bleaches and developers are, and read the boxes in-store, before purchasing. You may want to read some reviews online before you go to the store. I do want to state though, for the record, that if you have “tricky hair” permed, heavily color-treated, super-curly, long, damaged, frizzy, very dark, etc. it probably is better to have your hair double processed at a salon the first time you go blond, especially if you’re wanting to attain that elusive ice blond. Save those pennies, because someone who knows what they’re doing shouldn’t come cheaply for this overhaul. Once you’re there and getting it done, you can talk to the stylist about the best ways to prolong your shade at home and save your dollars in the long run. 12 DIY Definitions DEVELOPER Developer is the ingredient that oxidizes your hair color and makes it stick to your hair permanently. It’s the hair dye glue, basically. It works by opening the cuticle layer of the hair and allowing the color molecules to penetrate and color to be deposited into the cortex. Developer comes in four volumes: 10, 20, 30, and 40. A 10-volume peroxide is the standard oxidizing strength for permanent, no-lift hair color. It’s for when you just want to add a tint or color tone to hair of the same lightness level. Then 20 does the same thing but also lifts the hair’s color level by 1–2 levels. This works well if you want to go one shade lighter than you already are. Next up is 30—the most common developer—which lifts you 2–3 levels and is used by those trying to go two shades lighter, or more. Finally, 40 should only be used in salons and by professionals. DIY Definitionsh DOUBLE PROCESS Double process is exactly what it sounds like: a coloring technique that requires two steps. It is sometimes referred to as “two-step coloring.” Usually, the first step of this process is lightening. The second part is depositing the new color (if you’re doing a color on your new blond) or toner (if you’re keeping your new blonde shade). It can also mean coloring your hair one color and then adding highlights or lowlights. MATERIALS • Old T-shirt and towels • Rubber gloves • 1 packet of hair bleach • Disposable mixing bowl • Tint brush • 30-volume developer • Shampoo • Conditioner • Leave-in conditioner 13 The best way to prep—especially if you’re starting with a dark base—is to treat your hair with leavein conditioner a few weeks before you plan to dye. It’s especially important to leave your ends saturated. You can also deep condition your hair in the shower about once a week. This way, your hair is in its most healthy state going into your transformation. Once you’ve planned which day to dye, stop washing your hair. The longer you can go the better, but definitely don’t wash your hair for at least three days before. Tips to Dye For BLEACHING A BIG MANE Have a lot of hair to work with? Consider applying the bleach to your roots last. The roots will develop the fastest because of the heat from your scalp, and you don’t want bleach sitting on them while you go around your whole head! GET CRACKING 1 Bleach is strong! Prep your space for the bleaching process by laying down an old towel over any workspace you don’t want to stain. Put on an old T-shirt, drape another old towel on your shoulders, and put on your rubber gloves. 2 Be sure to follow the instructions on your bleach and developer for mixing the two together. 14 3 If you’re doing your whole head, divide your hair into workable sections. Four will be good for short hair, but using six or more on longer hair will be helpful. 4 Take one section at a time and paint the front and back of the hair strands, from the root down to the very ends, saturating each section. It’s more time consuming than just slopping it all on, but it’s worth it! 5 Once you’ve covered everything you want, wait the amount of time suggested on your developer, though I wouldn’t suggest going even a minute over one hour. A lot of times with hair dye, you can try to keep your hair saturated for ages before washing it out in hopes of really getting the color to stick. You don’t want to do that here! Additionally, while your head will burn a little, if you feel like your scalp is on fire, wash the stuff out immediately. It’s not worth damaging your hair or scalp! The right hairstylist can fix or advise on any horror-story hair situation, though I can’t promise they won’t slap your wrist for frying your locks! 15 6 During your wait-a-thon, you can check on your strands and watch them lighten or “lift”. Don’t freak out if the color isn’t exactly the color you wanted. It’s normal for the shade to be a bit off (and yellow-y, sometimes called “brassy”) pre-toner. If your hair is orange and remains orange even after the full hour, wash everything out right away and either head to a salon or try again in a week. Might I suggest wearing an adorable beanie in the meantime? 7 Finally, you’re ready to immediately shampoo and condition your hair. After that, you’ll also want to apply the leave-in conditioner according to the instructions on the container. Your strands need all the nutrients! You might be happy with your results right off the bat—congrats, you’re done! Or you may not yet have reached the shade you were going for. In that case, you can repeat the process. However, you should wait at least three days to do this and you shouldn’t wash your hair during that wait time. 16 Once you’ve got the look you’re going for, you can use a toner to even out the shine and shade. I love Manic Panic’s Virgin Snow, but you should research what color you’re looking for and use what’s best for you and your hair. If blonde was what you were after, congrats, you’re done! Shampoo your hair daily with a blond-specific shampoo and conditioner. You can retone if any discoloration happens (hello, creeping yellow-y hue), but if you were going blond only as a base color, you’re now ready to apply color. Tips to Dye For WANNA GO WILD? If your style is to keep very short hair that gets buzzed with a clip down to about a half-inch or so, you can have a lot of fun bleaching patterns into your hair. All you need to do is cut out whatever shapes you like from some thin cardboard, like an old cereal box. You can do stars, polka dots, or even some leopard print. Hold the cardboard stencil against your hair until the hair pokes through the shapes you cut. Then paint the bleach on and remove the cardboard. Rinse after the allotted time and you’re done! Didn’t turn out like you hoped? Shave it off! 17 HAIR CHALKING RECIPE AND TECHNIQUES Of all of the temporary ways to dye your hair, hair chalk is the best option for those who want to experiment without much of a commitment. Because it’s super-trendy right now, there are tons of hair chalks on the market in every color imaginable that you can easily apply for a one-day use and wash out. Most of the hair chalks out there are very similar to art pastels used for drawing, and a lot of people just use those because they’re so easy to find. But if you love DIY and want to make your own custom colors that work best for your hair, you’ll probably prefer to make your own. The brightness of the shade will of course depend on your starting color, but even those with dark hair can achieve a tinting effect with hair chalk. It’s easy to apply and very easy to control, making it a perfect choice for someone who wants to apply a color only to their tips or as highlights but doesn’t want to fuss with the messiness of actual hair dye. You can buy chalk that is specifically made for your hair, or you can use regular soft pastels found in any art supply store. First you have to decide where to chalk. If it’s your first time out, you may want to begin by just doing your ends or one chunk of hair near the front of your face. Once you’re used to the process, you can get more creative with how you apply it. One of my favorite looks is pulling half your hair back and just doing the hair underneath to achieve a peekaboo effect. MATERIALS • Old T-shirt and towels • Rubber gloves • Chalk • Spray bottle filled with water • Flat iron or curling iron • Hairspray 18 LOOK WHO’S CHALKING! 1 Begin by prepping yourself for application. Cover your workspace and your shoulders with a towel, or wear an old T-shirt that you won’t mind staining. Put on gloves to protect your hands. 2 Using the spray bottle with water, wet the part of your hair that you’d like to chalk. If you’re doing multiple areas (or all of your tips), start with one section at a time. You want to really saturate the hair without leaving it dripping wet. 3 Support the piece of hair you want to chalk in your palm. Hold the hair away from your head and, with your other hand, drag the chalk along the hair where you’d like the color to appear. You’ll want to really rub the chalk in, going up and down and putting pressure against your other hand. No need to hurt yourself, but really get it in there! Move slowly to avoid crunching up your hair as you move up and down. 19

Author Loren Lankford Isbn 9781612432809 File size 7MB Year 2014 Pages 128 Language English File format PDF Category Hobbies Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare HAIR THAT’S TO DYE FOR Want an accent streak of fire-engine red? How about forest-green tips? Or maybe you’re daring enough to transform your locks into a rainbow of bright colors? It’s all up to you! With DIY Dye and some imagination, you can easily personalize your hair with any color and style imaginable. This comprehensive guide offers step-by-step instructions on every aspect of at-home hair coloring including: • Picking the right dye • Concocting original hues • Adding highlights • Getting an ombre in any color Whether you’re looking to add color for a day, week, month or longer, DIY Dye shows you how to fashion the look you want using affordable options like coloring kits, chalks, henna, food coloring and even Kool-Aid packets.     Download (7MB) Natural Hair Coloring Fly Tying: An Enjoyable Hobby Diy Braids: From Crowns To Fishtails, Easy, Step-by-step Hair Braiding Instructions Quick Knits with Speed Stix Braids, Buns, and Twists!: Step-by-Step Tutorials for 82 Fabulous Hairstyles Load more posts

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