Deborah Ferro – Artistic Techniques with Adobe Photoshop and Corel Painter: A Guide for Photographers by Deborah Ferro


99588df970d79bc-261x361.jpg Author Deborah Ferro
Isbn 9781584281658
File size 5MB
Year 2005
Pages 127
Language English
File format PDF
Category art


 

I share the joy of this book with my husband Rick, who inspires me daily. He has truly helped me to see the light, to grow as a photographer, and to love life. I would also like to thank my mother, who has always believed in me, loved me, and prayed for me. Because of you, Mom, I believed I could accomplish anything I set my mind to. A special thanks to Lori Gragg and Angela Tankersley for all their assistance in helping me get this book ready for print. To my children, family, and clients whose images make up this book, I want to thank you for helping me make it possible. And especially to Michelle and Craig for giving me the opportunity to share my passion for artistic images—thank you so much! Copyright © 2006 by Deborah Lynn Ferro. All rights reserved. Published by: Amherst Media, Inc. P.O. Box 586 Buffalo, N.Y. 14226 Fax: 716-874-4508 www.AmherstMedia.com Publisher: Craig Alesse Senior Editor/Production Manager: Michelle Perkins Assistant Editor: Barbara A. Lynch-Johnt Editorial Assistance: Carey Anne Maines ISBN: 1-58428-165-0 Library of Congress Card Catalog Number: 2004113801 Printed in Korea. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopied, recorded or otherwise, without prior written consent from the publisher. Notice of Disclaimer: The information contained in this book is based on the author’s experience and opinions. The author and publisher will not be held liable for the use or misuse of the information in this book. TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD, by Tim Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Painting Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Sample Projects with Painter: Bridal Portrait . . . . . . . .28 1. GETTING STARTED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Sample Projects with Painter: Brother and Sister . . . .30 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Sample Projects with Painter: The Age of Innocence . .30 Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 6. ADDING TEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Graphics Pen and Tablet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Font Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Monitor Color Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Font Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Font Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Less is More . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 2. THE DIGITAL FINE-ART PRINT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Consistency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Does the Medium Matter? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Photoshop Tips for Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Elements of a Fine-Art Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Text Effects: Rick Bond, 007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Types of Fine-Art Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 7. DIGITAL HANDCOLORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 3. BASIC TIPS FOR PHOTOSHOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 The History of Handcoloring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 A Good Original . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Handcoloring Techniques: Cassie and Friends . . . . . .40 Photoshop Tips When Starting an Art Print Design . . .13 Handcoloring Techniques: Jamaica, Mon . . . . . . . . . . .41 Increasing the Canvas Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Tracking Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 4. BASIC TIPS FOR PAINTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Painter Tips When Starting an Art Print Design . . . . .19 Photoshop Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Painter: A Brief Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Sample Projects with Painter: Garden of Life . . . . . . .21 Sample Projects with Painter: Full of Life . . . . . . . . . . .22 Sample Projects with Painter: Petit Mademoiselle . . .24 Sample Projects with Painter: Vine Cottage . . . . . . . . .24 Additional Painter Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 5. CLASSIC PORTRAITURE TURNED INTO A PAINTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 8. POSTERIZATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Create an Artistic Impression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Posterizing Techniques: A Colorful Senior Portrait . . .45 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 Posterizing Techniques: Senior Portrait with a Background Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Posterizing Techniques: CD Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Drawing Techniques: Colorized Line Drawing . . . . . .102 Drawing Techniques: Pencil Sketches from Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Drawing Techniques: Colored Pencil Drawing . . . . . .105 9. CREATIVE CLONING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Cloning Techniques: Impressionist Landscape . . . . . .51 15. COOL EFFECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Cloning Techniques: Floral Impression . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Cool Techniques: Funky Chic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Cloning Techniques: Flower Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Cool Techniques: Increased Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Cloning Techniques: Wrapped in Flowers . . . . . . . . . .55 Cool Techniques: Circular Vignette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Cool Techniques: Oversharpening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 10. COLLAGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Collage Techniques: Innocent Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 16. RETOUCHING FOR GLAMOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Collage Techniques: Ravines Commercial Collage . . .61 Basic Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Collage Techniques: Senior Portrait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Healing Brush and Clone Stamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Collage Techniques: Three Faces of Cassie . . . . . . . . .65 Retouching Techniques: India Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Collage Techniques: In Search of Herself . . . . . . . . . . .66 Retouching Techniques: Dream Glow . . . . . . . . . . . .116 Collage Techniques: High-Key Senior Collage . . . . . . .67 Retouching Techniques: Two Heads Collage Techniques: The Fuji Filmstrip . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Are Better Than One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 11. COLOR WOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 17. SELLING AND MARKETING Color Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 YOUR FINE-ART PIECE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Primary Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Color Techniques: The French Woman . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Pricing Color Techniques: Combining Donate Your Craft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 Black & White and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Color Techniques: Combining Sepia and Color . . . . . .79 Color Techniques: Increased Color Saturation . . . . . . .81 Color Techniques: Color for Punch! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 12. ARTISTIC FILTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Filter Techniques: Dry Brush Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Filter Techniques: Crosshatch Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Filter Techniques: Photo Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 Filter Techniques: Plastic Wrap Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 Filter Techniques: Fresco Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Filter Techniques: Diffuse Glow Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 13. THE STYLES PALETTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Styles Techniques: Collage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Styles Techniques: Framing Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Styles Techniques: Digital Album Design . . . . . . . . . . .97 Styles Techniques: Rain Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 Styles Techniques: Hot Burst Collage . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 14. DRAWINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Image Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 Drawing Techniques: A Basic Sketch . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126 4 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® FOREWORD by Tim Kelly (M.Photog., Craftsmen, Fellow-ASP). W hen an artist truly listens to his or her own heart, the results are destined to be unique—and quite possibly amazing. The work of Deborah Lynn Ferro has become just that. This new collection, along with the corresponding inside look and instruction, is so much more than inspiring. Deborah’s images help us remember why we are artists in the first place. The broad range of treatments and presentations are a delight to the eye, containing both a “new” traditional feel and others that are really quite radical indeed. The style however, is that of a single artist who has found her way in a medium that won’t stand still. And this may be her greatest accomplishment, as the Deborah’s images help us remember why we are artists in the first place. greatest foil in our brave new world of digital art is the technology itself, which can often make even the accomplished fainthearted. Appreciating the work of today’s masters as much as those who came before, I still find immeasurable satisfaction in seeing former students mature artistically to this level. It remains a marvelous truth to me that artists who have made great personal investments, mastered their tools and techniques, and then create to satisfy themselves, will undoubtedly be successful in their clients’ eyes. An artist doesn’t need public acceptance, but isn’t it wonderful when there is an appreciative audience? I have always admonished my student artists to be unique. The best way to do that is to study and practice until your techniques are second nature. Then, be yourself. Shoot for yourself and create to please the artist within. Deborah is an artist of this age, a giving talent with a God-given talent who is now both producing beautiful art and inspiring others to do the same. Enjoy this wonderful new collection. FOREWORD 5 1. GETTING STARTED W hen using Photoshop or Painter for artistic design, it is essential to have the best tools available to you with the latest, up-todate technology to make your workflow smooth and precise. SOFTWARE When purchasing software, whether Adobe Photoshop or Corel Painter, it is important that you spend the money for your own, original version. If you have borrowed your copy of either program, you will not have technical support or be able to upgrade to new versions. With Photoshop CS, you can only load the software on two computers unless you add the network or multiple-computers options that are available for an additional fee. With the advancement of recent versions of Photoshop, more and more artwork can be achieved on photographs. With Photoshop, you have a variety of useful tools such as artistic filters, the Smudge and Liquify tools, the History Brush, and many other tools to enhance a photograph to a more painterly representation. However, Painter has more realistic, natural-media brushes and a wider variety of textures not offered in Photoshop. With Painter, you can paint with unlimited freedom of expression. One minute you can work with oils and the next with watercolor, allowing you to produce advanced tech- 6 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® The choice to purchase a Mac (left) or a PC (right) is a personal decision. Both Photoshop and Painter will operate from either platform. niques that are not practical with traditional painting, such as combining media. In order to work in Painter, you should have a working knowledge of Photoshop. With the advancements included in recent versions of Painter, it has now become easier than ever to transition between the two programs. And don’t worry—Photoshop and Painter files can be exchanged between both programs. COMPUTER If you are just starting out and have not yet purchased a computer, make sure that you get the most hard drive space, processor speed, and RAM that you can afford. The choice to purchase a PC or Mac is a personal decision; however, both Photoshop and Painter will operate from either platform. If you use a Windows system, it should have Windows 2000 or Windows XP, at the very least 256MB of RAM, and a 24-bit color display with a minimum 1024 x 768 resolution. MONITOR When choosing a monitor, a CRT monitor will, in most cases, give you better color and resolution than an LCD monitor. I prefer to work with two monitors, a CRT 22-inch LaCie Monitor for the primary image display, and a secondary flat LCD monitor for my tools. This enables me to move between the two monitors when working in either program, while maximizing the size of the image I am working with on the CRT monitor. The reason that I prefer the LaCie CRT monitor is because of its incredible color accuracy and resolution. It also has a hood screen that shields the screen from any light spill. CRT monitors (top) generally provide better color and resolution than LCD monitors (above). It is important that you calibrate your monitor on a regular basis, because monitors change their color range on a daily basis; however, the GETTING STARTED 7 average eye will not see the change. Your monitor should also be calibrated to whatever output source you choose. The calibration that we use for all of our monitors at Signature Studio is the Fuji Color Kit Profiler. GRAPHICS PEN AND TABLET An essential tool for any artistic design or retouching is a graphics pen and tablet. The pressure-sensitive graphics pen allows you to operate as an artist does with a pen, pencil, or brush. It enables you to draw or paint with precise detail. Imagine trying to retouch the eyeliner or eyelashes of a female portrait with a mouse—it’s like working with a rock or a bar of soap! With Corel Painter, having a graphics pen enables you to paint with brush strokes similar to traditional painting. There are several graphic pens and tablets on the market, but my preference is the Wacom Intuous Tablet and pen. The tablet I work with the most is 9 x 12 inches in size, so I can place it in my lap and paint with long strokes, as I used to on watercolor paper. COLOR SPACE On your computer, colors can be scientifically measured and precisely matched, which is essential when looking at the reproduction of an art piece. The color in your images, however, will also be created, edited, and viewed on a series of different devices that all have their own ways of recording, handling, and displaying color. Although a complete discussion on the complicated topic of color management is beyond the scope of this book, it’s important to keep a few basic concepts in mind. First, remember that different devices in your workflow use different color models to create color. Your monitor, for example, produces color using red, green, and blue light (the RGB color model). Your printer, on the other hand, produces color using cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks (the CMYK color model). As a result, some colors can be viewed on screen that cannot be produced by the printer, and some colors can be produced by the printer that cannot be displayed on a monitor. Even when two devices use the same color model, they will have different color spaces—a different range of colors that can be produced or dis- 8 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® A graphics pen and tablet are essential for artistic design and retouching. played. For example, both CRT and LCD monitors use RGB to produce colors, but because they use different means to display those colors, a specific red value would look different on the LCD monitor than on the CRT monitor. Even devices of the same brand and model frequently display colors differently, since it’s nearly impossible for two devices to be identical due to the limitations of manufacturing and materials. Now, let’s talk about the sRGB color space—the one that professional photographers should use throughout their workflow when printing with a professional lab. All 35mm-format digital cameras capture images in the sRGB color space (note: Some digital 35mm-format models do allow you to set the camera to a different color space using the camera’s menu options), and professional labs only print in sRGB color space. If you change your color space to anything other than sRGB, it will be necessary for the lab to change the color space back to sRGB in order to print, and this will negatively affect your printed image. This does not apply to large-format digital cameras (i.e. digital backs, etc.) or to images you print to your own inkjet printers—where you may be using the Adobe 1998 color space and ICC profiles specific to your printer. If you have been advised to change your color space to Adobe 1998, and you are using a 35mm digital camera to create images you’ll output at a professional lab, check your manual and call your lab to verify this information. EDUCATION Last but not least, don’t forget about education. Staying up-to-date on all the latest technology is difficult if you don’t set aside time to learn new techniques. When I first purchased Photoshop, I was self-taught—until I heard of the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP), start- Try to spend three hours a week ed by Scott Kelby. Attending my first NAPP convention was very exciting and made my head swim, but the information provided made it all worthwhile. Whether you attend a hands-on class on Photoshop or Painter, go to experimenting with a convention, or pick up a book (like this one), make it a practice to try out new techniques. spend three hours a week experimenting with new techniques or watching the exercises immediately while the information is new and fresh. Try to an instructional DVD or tutorial. It is a never-ending learning process, but the end result will be gratifying artistically—and it will add dollars to your pocket! GETTING STARTED 9 2. THE DIGITAL FINE-ART PRINT W hat defines the fine-art print? Is photography considered to be fine art? And how does it compare to fine-art paintings? With the introduction of image-manipulation programs like Photo- shop and Painter, we are also seeing a new entrant in the fine-art field: the digital fine-art print. If you think that we, in the digital age, are the first ones facing such questions, think again! A quick look at art history reveals that this evolution has been a part of the art world for a long, long time. Before photography, a person’s likeness was captured by means of an artistic painted portrait. Commissioning an artist to do a portrait was, by and large, a luxury available only to the affluent. To control costs, in fact, an expensive artist would sometimes be commissioned to paint the face and hands, while a less expensive artist would be hired to paint the subject’s body. When photography became widely used, traditional artists soon found themselves looking for new means of expression that would generate new interest among the public. With the fear that the invention of photography would take away their livelihood, artists decided to take a different approach. If photographers could capture an exact likeness, then artists would leave more to be interpreted by the viewer. As a result, less realistic and more impressionistic styles became prevalent. Of course, a photographer is an artist—but instead of using a paintbrush he uses a camera, and instead of paint he uses light. Today, however, through the world of digital artistry, photography and traditional art 10 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® This image has been manipulated in Photoshop. The original image, taken several years ago in Stowe, Vermont, was very overexposed and unusable. Using Photoshop, several steps were taken to enhance it. This included adding a new sky, adding color in the trees, darkening the contrast and color using the Burn tool, and oversharpening the image using a technique illustrated on page 110. The final result is a beautiful image. applications have become integrated as never before to produce a new form of fine art called the digital fine-art print. The answer, then, to what defines “fine art” is left open to interpretation. An additional factor, whether there is a demand for the digital fine-art print, depends on a variety of factors—from artistic mastery to marketing skills. DOES THE MEDIUM MATTER? My philosophy is that art is an expression of your creative talent and, therefore, represents you. The medium you use to express your creativity is merely a tool and not the actual artwork. You don’t disregard a writer if he uses a typewriter instead of a pen. If the smell of paint is what you seek, then by all means paint traditionally. Why not even combine the two mediums together? As humans, we have only begun to tap into a very small percentage of the creativity that our brains are capable of. Whatever opinion you hold, have fun with your artistic talent and be willing to try new ways of expressing yourself creatively. ELEMENTS OF A FINE-ART PRINT ELEMENTS OF ART • Color • Form • Line • Shape • Space • Texture • Value PRINCIPLES OF ART • Balance • Emphasis • Contrast • Proportion • Pattern • Rhythm • Unity • Variety MERIT PRINT ELEMENTS • Impact • Creativity • Style • Composition • Image presentation • Color balance • Center of interest • Lighting • Subject matter • Image quality • Technique • Storytelling There are many similarities between traditional art and photography. Compare the elements and principles of art to the elements that qualify a photo to be a merit print under the universal guidelines of print competition or when achieving a Professional Photographers of America Master’s degree. TYPES OF FINE-ART PRINTS In the art world there are three types of photographic prints considered to fall into the category of the “fine-art print.” They are the photographic print, THE DIGITAL FINE-ART PRINT 11 the digital print, and the lithographic print. The photographic prints are original straight prints and any manipulation is done by hand. The digital print is printed from a digital file, but can originate from either a digital or film capture. The lithographic print is a commercially mass-produced print. There are a variety of ways to print your digital art piece—from traditional watercolor paper to canvas. Giclée prints, created with an Iris Printer (a specialized, high-end type of inkjet) on watercolor paper, are the predominant type of digital prints shown in galleries and have become the standard among photographers and digital artists today. “Giclée” is actually a French word and was picked by Jack Duganne in 1991 to describe the fine-art print produced from an Iris inkjet printer. He felt this was necessary because of the perception of the word “inkjet print,” which, for a lot of people, means “cheap” or “something anyone could do.” Duganne wanted to raise the level of perception among the art consumer. Of course, digital art pieces can also be produced in house. If you decide to do this, consider applying a varnish to each finished piece that won’t be displayed behind glass. In addition to helping to protect the delicate surface of your image, the varnish will typically enhance the brightness, saturation, and contrast of your work. There are also a variety of wonderful papers out there that you can sample and try. So do your research and decide which paper elevates your artwork and best represents your expertise. 12 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® This image of Sacre Coeur (Paris, France) was captured on film, scanned, and then manipulated in Photoshop to create a digital fine-art print. The color saturation was enhanced by selecting areas of the image with the Magic Wand tool and increasing the saturation by choosing Image>Adjustments>Hue/Saturation. The next step was to add a Dry Brush filter by choosing Filters>Artistic>Dry Brush. The final design was printed on watercolor paper. 3. BASIC TIPS FOR PHOTOSHOP A s you begin to work on your images in Photoshop and Painter, there are a few basic techniques you will find beneficial—and find yourself using time and again. These tech- niques, as well as some basic strategies for working in both programs, are included in this and the following chapter. A GOOD ORIGINAL When getting started, having the best possible image to work with allows There are a few basic techniques you will find yourself using time and again. you to spend more time artistically altering or retouching the images and little (if any) time color correcting the image for improper exposure. Therefore, getting the image correctly exposed before bringing it into Photoshop (and then, perhaps, on to Painter) is imperative. If you are shooting digitally, this means you will need to be extremely rigorous in your metering and exposure techniques, since digital has a lower contrast range and exposure latitude than film. There are many excellent books devoted to exposure and color correction, so if you are struggling with this aspect of photography, you should consider consulting one or more. If the image is acquired from an outside source, make sure that you have the best possible scan or digital file to work with and that any color correction needed has been achieved before trying any of the examples in this book. PHOTOSHOP TIPS WHEN STARTING AN ART PRINT DESIGN When starting an art-print project, the following are a few good Photoshop techniques to keep in mind: 1. Always work on a PSD file; be sure to work in layers. Working in layers and preserving these layers when you save your file makes it BASIC TIPS FOR PHOTOSHOP 13 easy to correct mistakes, refine your image, and continue to fine-tune your work over the course of a number of image-editing sessions. 2. Save and save often. Believe it or not, computers do crash—and they’ll usually do it just as you wrap up a long session working on an image! 3. Start an action to record every step. As described on pages 17–18, you can use actions to record your work, making it easier to replicate a series of steps that create a look you like. 4. Use Adjustment Layers and Layer Masks. These handy tools give you an amazing degree of control over your images. Consult any These handy tools give you an amazing degree of control . . . This is a wonderful example how a beautiful image (above) can be made better by simply darkening it using the Curves or Levels tool on an adjustment layer (right). When using an adjustment layer, you maintain control over the image and can always revert back to the original. Here, the final image was darkened to make the background far less distracting. basic Photoshop book for tips on using them and they’ll soon become a critical part of your image-editing arsenal. 5. When using filters, combine and alter them so that your image does not look automated. Savvy viewers of digital images know exactly what an image looks like when any of Photoshop’s filters are applied individually. Combining and altering the filters produces a more creative, customized look. INCREASING THE CANVAS SIZE If you are used to shooting with a square film format and make the switch to photographing with a digital camera that is in a 35mm format, the new rectangular aspect ratio of your images can be hard to get used to. As a result, you may find that you have very little space around your subject. If you wish to crop the image square, you’ll need to give the subject some room by moving back or using different lenses. If that’s not possible, you can still change the size of your canvas and turn the image into a square format. The instructions for this technique are as follows. 1. In Photoshop, open the desired image with a vertical format. 2. Maximize the image to fit the screen. 3. Choose the Crop tool and, in the Options bar, activate the Clear option. BASIC TIPS FOR PHOTOSHOP 15 The original image (above) was nice, but adding space around the subject (left) produced a more powerful composition. 4. Crop along the borders of the entire image and extend the side of the crop indicator out beyond the left and right borders of the image until you have created a square shape. 5. Double click within the image to crop it. 6. At this point, you will see that additional space will appear in the areas where you dragged the crop indicator outside the original edges of the frame. The color of this area will be whatever the background color was set to in your Toolbar—but don’t worry, we’ll change that! 7. Next, choose the Rectangular Marquee tool and make a selection from the top to the bottom of the image including the background only—not the subject. Get as much of the background as you can. 8. Hit Ctrl/Cmd + T to transform your selection. A transform indicator with handles will appear. Click on a handle and drag it out from the center of the image to stretch the background to fill the new canvas area. Double click within the box to apply the transformation. 9. If necessary, repeat steps 7 and 8 on the other side of your image until you have expanded the background to cover the new canvas. 16 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® 10. At this point, you may want to clean up the background with the Patch tool so that it will look as seamless as possible. 11. Go back to the Crop tool and crop the image to the precise dimensions needed. Keep in mind that, because of the stretching and distorting, this technique can only be used on images with a studio or solid background. Obviously, this technique will not work on an environmental image. TRACKING YOUR WORK How many times have you sat at the computer, experimented with an image, and come up with a wonderful result—only to find that you can’t remember everything you did to get there? Sure, you can go back to your History palette and write down your steps, but a more efficient way is to In the image above, you can see that the tricycle touched the bottom of the image and the subject was crowded in the frame. By increasing the canvas, space was created to make a more appropriate 8 x 10inch print. The final image was then presented in sepia tone (right). create an action when you start the image and stop recording it when you finish. Then you can print out the actions in your word processor. I suggest you keep a three-ring notebook handy with all of your favorite creative actions in it. Instructions for printing an action are as follows: 1. Go to My Documents and create a New Folder called Photoshop Actions (this is the folder in which you will save any actions that you want to print). 2. Open the image that you want to work on. 3. Go to the Actions palette. 4. Create a New Set of actions by clicking on the right drop-down arrow in the palette. 5. Name the new set. 6. In the same drop-down menu, click on New Action. (At this point you have the option to name your action and assign it a function key, which is probably not necessary unless you are planning to save this action for use in the future on another image. Actions are typically used to reduce production time on processes you perform on a regular basis.) 7. At the bottom of the Actions palette, click on the Record button. Begin working on the image. 8. When your work on the image is complete, go to the bottom of the Actions palette and click on the Stop button. 9. Hold down the Ctrl + Alt and select Save Actions from the drop-down menu in the Actions palette. 10. In the Save box, which will pop up, simply rename the action and save it into the new folder you made in step 1. 11. Go to Microsoft Word, or any word processor, and go to File>Open, identify your Saved Actions file, and open it. 12. Simply print as normal. Corel Painter also allows you to record your steps and play them back through scripts similar to Photoshop’s actions. 18 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® Keep a three-ring notebook handy with all of your favorite creative actions in it. 4. BASIC TIPS FOR PAINTER W hen it comes to natural media, no digital artistry program can compare to Corel Painter—it’s the only software on the market that gives you all the tools needed to create a digital work of art that is actually comparable to a traditional sketch or painting. With more than four hundred predefined brushes and the ability to use chalk, pastels, watercolors, oils, crayons, pencils, felt pens, ink, and more, your Endless changes can be achieved while keeping the original image intact. creative capability is limitless! Painting strokes can be undone with the click of a button, and endless changes can be achieved while keeping the original image intact. Painter can be compared to a well-supplied artist’s studio—but with no mess or clean-up. Before photography became a tool for my artistic expression, I had sold commission pieces of my pen-and-ink sketches and watercolor paintings. I had also trained and worked as a makeup artist for Chanel cosmetics. Both experiences influenced my approach to digital artistry. There are times when I see an image in my head before I capture it in the camera. Sometimes, though, the camera is not enough for the final creative expression. With Painter, I can translate my artistic vision into a work of art. PAINTER TIPS WHEN STARTING AN ART PRINT DESIGN When starting an art-print project, the following are a few good Painter techniques to keep in mind: 1. Do all color correction and retouching to the image in Photoshop before bringing it into Painter. These are the kinds of corrections Photoshop is designed for, so you’ll find powerful tools there for making this type of adjustments to your photograph. 2. Add a white canvas around the image so that you will have plenty of room to paint beyond the original edges of the image. This BASIC TIPS FOR PAINTER 19 produces the most natural artistic look, without an artificially sharp edge. 3. Always work on a cloned copy of the original photograph by going to File>Clone. As with any digital imaging, working on a duplicate file makes it easy to start over if need be. 4. Save the file in Painter’s native file format, called RIFF. This allows files with layers to be reopened in Painter so you can continue to work on them in future editing sessions. 5. Save versions of your work in progress as RIFF files. Give each version a consecutive number so you can effortlessly backtrack through the history of an image. Be sure to save a version just before flattening (eliminating the layers) for final output. PHOTOSHOP FILES One of the benefits of Painter is that it works seamlessly with Photoshop— you can open Photoshop files in Painter and Painter files in Photoshop. In fact, Painter’s work area is very similar to Photoshop’s main work window. Talk about ease for those of us who are familiar with Photoshop! You can edit and retouch an image in Photoshop, then take it into Painter and turn it into a beautiful oil painting that can be printed on canvas. You can even create sketches from photographs. Never before has it been easier for a photographer to enhance his or her photos—and turn it into profit! PAINTER: A BRIEF OVERVIEW As you’ll see, there are many similarities between Photoshop and Painter. The layout of the Painter work space is similar to the one found in Photoshop, with the Toolbar on the left, the Layers and Channels palettes to the right, and options for the specific tools at the top. In Painter, as with Photoshop, you can customize your palettes and only keep open the ones you need to work on the current image, so you can maximize your workspace. Both programs also recognize most universal keyboard shortcuts. The variety of brushes and selection of media available in Painter is incredible. You can custom build your own brushes in the Brush Creator or mix custom colors and store them for use again and again. Obviously the ease, freedom, and cross-mixing of mediums surpasses that of traditional painting. For example, true dimensional texture can be achieved through the Impasto brushes and liquid ink. Any of the brushes or blenders that include grain in their title will also add texture by controlling how much color embeds in the paper. 20 ARTISTIC TECHNIQUES WITH ADOBE® PHOTOSHOP® AND COREL® PAINTER® One of the benefits of Painter is that it works seamlessly with Photoshop.

Author Deborah Ferro Isbn 9781584281658 File size 5MB Year 2005 Pages 127 Language English File format PDF Category Art Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Photographers will be able to magically transform photographic images in myriad ways using the digital counterpart of traditional artists’ tools and this guide to Adobe Photoshop and Corel Painter. Covering hardware and software requirements, printing actions that will simplify the output process, instructions for adjusting a digital image’s canvas size, and other essentials, this manual explains all the skills needed to rev up one’s creative arsenal and begin outputting extraordinary and artful images. This handbook is a perfect complement to photographers with a traditional arts background as well as those who are ready to create special niche products to set their images apart.     Download (5MB) The Painter’s Craft: An Introduction to Artists’ Methods and Materials Man Ray (Art dossier Giunti) The Best of Adobe Photoshop The Painter’s Eye: Learning to Look at Contemporary American Art Painter IX Creativity: Digital Artists Handbook Load more posts

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