City Walks Deck by Christina Henry de Tessan


035bdce5f30df66-261x361.jpg Author Christina Henry de Tessan
Isbn 9781452162447
File size 5.17MB
Year 2018
Pages 50
Language English
File format PDF
Category travel



 

CITY WALKS NEW YORK 5 0 A D V E N T UR E S O N F O O T Text by Christina Henry de Tessan CHRONICLE BOOKS SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK IS A WALKER’S PARADISE. The best way by far to experience this gargantuan, occasionally intimidating city is on foot, absorbing the ever-changing kaleidoscope of details—people, architecture, cafés, museums, shop fronts, music, smells, street food, parks, yellow cabs, and plenty more—that make this city what it is. Once you’re sharing the sidewalks with locals, this vast, soaring metropolis becomes not only manageable, but infinitely enjoyable. By walking its streets and exploring its rich patchwork of neighborhoods, you’ll begin to really understand what sets New York apart from the rest of the world. The only problem is that after a few days of its intoxicating energy, you may find you never want to leave. GETTING AROUND NEW YORK New York is divided into five boroughs. Most of the areas of interest to visitors are on the island of Manhattan, a long, narrow strip of land separated from New Jersey by the Hudson River on its western side and from other mainland boroughs by the East River on its eastern side. Outside of Manhattan, you’ll find the Bronx to the north, Queens to the east, Brooklyn to the southeast, and Staten Island to the south. With a population of some 2.5 million, Brooklyn alone is the fourth-largest city in the U.S., and this new edition includes several new walks in that borough. Getting around most of Manhattan is quite easy—numbered streets run east-west and get higher as you go north (20 numbered streets equal a mile). Avenues run northsouth, with numbers increasing from east to west. Things get a little trickier downtown, where named streets replace numbers, and some neighborhoods (for example, Greenwich Village) are a bit of a tangled maze. However, the good news is that you are rarely far from an easily recognizable artery or subway station that will enable you to re-orient yourself. Long and narrow, Central Park covers 843 massive acres from 59th St. in Midtown up to 110th St., dividing the Upper East Side and the Upper West Side. While New York City extends far beyond Manhattan and comprises a huge population and a geography complicated by multiple rivers and bridges, the city as a whole is almost shockingly easy to navigate. The public transit system is nothing short of miraculous, efficiently conveying an average of 7 million people throughout its labyrinth of tunnels and streets each day. Purchase a MetroCard (select a card with a specific number of rides or buy a pass for a flat fee for unlimited rides for a set number of days—often the best deal for visitors), and study a subway map to orient yourself. Subway trains are identified by a number or letter and a final destination (Queens) or direction (Uptown), so it’s useful to have at least a rudimentary idea of the five boroughs’ locations in relation to Manhattan. HOW TO USE THESE CARDS The individual walks described in these cards start at the southern tip of Manhattan and work their way north to Harlem, with a detour to Williamsburg, before covering the borough of Brooklyn and wrapping up with Governors Island. They offer a mix of experiences. While some focus on the city’s museums and architectural or historic landmarks, others highlight fabulous shopping, iconic residential neighborhoods, and the city’s beautiful parks. You can easily string together several walks or opt to spend an entire afternoon in a single area. You’ll find subway information for the starting and ending points of every walk on every card. Some walks are loops, while others are one-way with a transit stop at each end. All points of interest that appear in bold in the text are numbered, and the corresponding numbers appear on the cards’ map sides. The walks vary in length, though most are between one and two miles and can be completed in an hour or two at a leisurely pace. On the card maps, 1 inch equals 750 feet, so 5 inches is approximately three-quarters of a mile. The cards with white borders around the map side describe longer walks and are created to the scale of 1 inch to 1,250 feet, or a little less than a quarter of a mile per inch. So put on your most comfortable shoes, pack some sunscreen, choose a few cards, and hit the ground walking— New York City awaits! CITY WALKS NEW YORK 5 0 A D V E N T UR E S O N F O O T Text by Christina Henry de Tessan NEW YORK IS A WALKER’S PARADISE. The best way by far to experience this gargantuan, occasionally intimidating city is on foot, absorbing the ever-changing kaleidoscope of details—people, architecture, cafés, museums, shop fronts, music, smells, street food, parks, yellow cabs, and plenty more—that make this city what it is. Once you’re sharing the sidewalks with locals, this vast, soaring metropolis becomes not only manageable, but infinitely enjoyable. By walking its streets and exploring its rich patchwork of neighborhoods, you’ll begin to really understand what sets New York apart from the rest of the world. The only problem is that after a few days of its intoxicating energy, you may find you never want to leave. GETTING AROUND NEW YORK New York is divided into five boroughs. Most of the areas of interest to visitors are on the island of Manhattan, a long, narrow strip of land separated from New Jersey by the Hudson River on its western side and from other mainland boroughs by the East River on its eastern side. Outside of Manhattan, you’ll find the Bronx to the north, Queens to the east, Brooklyn to the southeast, and Staten Island to the south. With a population of some 2.5 million, Brooklyn alone is the fourth-largest city in the U.S., and this new edition includes several new walks in that borough. Getting around most of Manhattan is quite easy—numbered streets run east-west and get higher as you go north (20 numbered streets equal a mile). Avenues run northsouth, with numbers increasing from east to west. Things get a little trickier downtown, where named streets replace numbers, and some neighborhoods (for example, Greenwich Village) are a bit of a tangled maze. However, the good news is that you are rarely far from an easily recognizable artery or subway station that will enable you to re-orient yourself. Long and narrow, Central Park covers 843 massive acres from 59th St. in Midtown up to 110th St., dividing the Upper East Side and the Upper West Side. While New York City extends far beyond Manhattan and comprises a huge population and a geography complicated by multiple rivers and bridges, the city as a whole is almost shockingly easy to navigate. The public transit system is nothing short of miraculous, efficiently conveying an average of 7 million people throughout its labyrinth of tunnels and streets each day. Purchase a MetroCard (select a card with a specific number of rides or buy a pass for a flat fee for unlimited rides for a set number of days—often the best deal for visitors), and study a subway map to orient yourself. Subway trains are identified by a number or letter and a final destination (Queens) or direction (Uptown), so it’s useful to have at least a rudimentary idea of the five boroughs’ locations in relation to Manhattan. HOW TO USE THESE CARDS The individual walks described in these cards start at the southern tip of Manhattan and work their way north to Harlem, with a detour to Williamsburg, before covering the borough of Brooklyn and wrapping up with Governors Island. They offer a mix of experiences. While some focus on the city’s museums and architectural or historic landmarks, others highlight fabulous shopping, iconic residential neighborhoods, and the city’s beautiful parks. You can easily string together several walks or opt to spend an entire afternoon in a single area. You’ll find subway information for the starting and ending points of every walk on every card. Some walks are loops, while others are one-way with a transit stop at each end. All points of interest that appear in bold in the text are numbered, and the corresponding numbers appear on the cards’ map sides. The walks vary in length, though most are between one and two miles and can be completed in an hour or two at a leisurely pace. On the card maps, 1 inch equals 750 feet, so 5 inches is approximately three-quarters of a mile. The cards with white borders around the map side describe longer walks and are created to the scale of 1 inch to 1,250 feet, or a little less than a quarter of a mile per inch. So put on your most comfortable shoes, pack some sunscreen, choose a few cards, and hit the ground walking— New York City awaits! CITY WALKS NEW YORK 5 0 A D V E N T UR E S O N F O O T Text by Christina Henry de Tessan NEW YORK IS A WALKER’S PARADISE. The best way by far to experience this gargantuan, occasionally intimidating city is on foot, absorbing the ever-changing kaleidoscope of details—people, architecture, cafés, museums, shop fronts, music, smells, street food, parks, yellow cabs, and plenty more—that make this city what it is. Once you’re sharing the sidewalks with locals, this vast, soaring metropolis becomes not only manageable, but infinitely enjoyable. By walking its streets and exploring its rich patchwork of neighborhoods, you’ll begin to really understand what sets New York apart from the rest of the world. The only problem is that after a few days of its intoxicating energy, you may find you never want to leave. GETTING AROUND NEW YORK New York is divided into five boroughs. Most of the areas of interest to visitors are on the island of Manhattan, a long, narrow strip of land separated from New Jersey by the Hudson River on its western side and from other mainland boroughs by the East River on its eastern side. Outside of Manhattan, you’ll find the Bronx to the north, Queens to the east, Brooklyn to the southeast, and Staten Island to the south. With a population of some 2.5 million, Brooklyn alone is the fourth-largest city in the U.S., and this new edition includes several new walks in that borough. Getting around most of Manhattan is quite easy—numbered streets run east-west and get higher as you go north (20 numbered streets equal a mile). Avenues run northsouth, with numbers increasing from east to west. Things get a little trickier downtown, where named streets replace numbers, and some neighborhoods (for example, Greenwich Village) are a bit of a tangled maze. However, the good news is that you are rarely far from an easily recognizable artery or subway station that will enable you to re-orient yourself. Long and narrow, Central Park covers 843 massive acres from 59th St. in Midtown up to 110th St., dividing the Upper East Side and the Upper West Side. While New York City extends far beyond Manhattan and comprises a huge population and a geography complicated by multiple rivers and bridges, the city as a whole is almost shockingly easy to navigate. The public transit system is nothing short of miraculous, efficiently conveying an average of 7 million people throughout its labyrinth of tunnels and streets each day. Purchase a MetroCard (select a card with a specific number of rides or buy a pass for a flat fee for unlimited rides for a set number of days—often the best deal for visitors), and study a subway map to orient yourself. Subway trains are identified by a number or letter and a final destination (Queens) or direction (Uptown), so it’s useful to have at least a rudimentary idea of the five boroughs’ locations in relation to Manhattan. HOW TO USE THESE CARDS The individual walks described in these cards start at the southern tip of Manhattan and work their way north to Harlem, with a detour to Williamsburg, before covering the borough of Brooklyn and wrapping up with Governors Island. They offer a mix of experiences. While some focus on the city’s museums and architectural or historic landmarks, others highlight fabulous shopping, iconic residential neighborhoods, and the city’s beautiful parks. You can easily string together several walks or opt to spend an entire afternoon in a single area. You’ll find subway information for the starting and ending points of every walk on every card. Some walks are loops, while others are one-way with a transit stop at each end. All points of interest that appear in bold in the text are numbered, and the corresponding numbers appear on the cards’ map sides. The walks vary in length, though most are between one and two miles and can be completed in an hour or two at a leisurely pace. On the card maps, 1 inch equals 750 feet, so 5 inches is approximately three-quarters of a mile. The cards with white borders around the map side describe longer walks and are created to the scale of 1 inch to 1,250 feet, or a little less than a quarter of a mile per inch. So put on your most comfortable shoes, pack some sunscreen, choose a few cards, and hit the ground walking— New York City awaits! CITY WALKS NEW YORK 5 0 A D V E N T UR E S O N F O O T Text by Christina Henry de Tessan NEW YORK IS A WALKER’S PARADISE. The best way by far to experience this gargantuan, occasionally intimidating city is on foot, absorbing the ever-changing kaleidoscope of details—people, architecture, cafés, museums, shop fronts, music, smells, street food, parks, yellow cabs, and plenty more—that make this city what it is. Once you’re sharing the sidewalks with locals, this vast, soaring metropolis becomes not only manageable, but infinitely enjoyable. By walking its streets and exploring its rich patchwork of neighborhoods, you’ll begin to really understand what sets New York apart from the rest of the world. The only problem is that after a few days of its intoxicating energy, you may find you never want to leave. GETTING AROUND NEW YORK New York is divided into five boroughs. Most of the areas of interest to visitors are on the island of Manhattan, a long, narrow strip of land separated from New Jersey by the Hudson River on its western side and from other mainland boroughs by the East River on its eastern side. Outside of Manhattan, you’ll find the Bronx to the north, Queens to the east, Brooklyn to the southeast, and Staten Island to the south. With a population of some 2.5 million, Brooklyn alone is the fourth-largest city in the U.S., and this new edition includes several new walks in that borough. Getting around most of Manhattan is quite easy—numbered streets run east-west and get higher as you go north (20 numbered streets equal a mile). Avenues run northsouth, with numbers increasing from east to west. Things get a little trickier downtown, where named streets replace numbers, and some neighborhoods (for example, Greenwich Village) are a bit of a tangled maze. However, the good news is that you are rarely far from an easily recognizable artery or subway station that will enable you to re-orient yourself. Long and narrow, Central Park covers 843 massive acres from 59th St. in Midtown up to 110th St., dividing the Upper East Side and the Upper West Side. While New York City extends far beyond Manhattan and comprises a huge population and a geography complicated by multiple rivers and bridges, the city as a whole is almost shockingly easy to navigate. The public transit system is nothing short of miraculous, efficiently conveying an average of 7 million people throughout its labyrinth of tunnels and streets each day. Purchase a MetroCard (select a card with a specific number of rides or buy a pass for a flat fee for unlimited rides for a set number of days—often the best deal for visitors), and study a subway map to orient yourself. Subway trains are identified by a number or letter and a final destination (Queens) or direction (Uptown), so it’s useful to have at least a rudimentary idea of the five boroughs’ locations in relation to Manhattan. HOW TO USE THESE CARDS The individual walks described in these cards start at the southern tip of Manhattan and work their way north to Harlem, with a detour to Williamsburg, before covering the borough of Brooklyn and wrapping up with Governors Island. They offer a mix of experiences. While some focus on the city’s museums and architectural or historic landmarks, others highlight fabulous shopping, iconic residential neighborhoods, and the city’s beautiful parks. You can easily string together several walks or opt to spend an entire afternoon in a single area. You’ll find subway information for the starting and ending points of every walk on every card. Some walks are loops, while others are one-way with a transit stop at each end. All points of interest that appear in bold in the text are numbered, and the corresponding numbers appear on the cards’ map sides. The walks vary in length, though most are between one and two miles and can be completed in an hour or two at a leisurely pace. On the card maps, 1 inch equals 750 feet, so 5 inches is approximately three-quarters of a mile. The cards with white borders around the map side describe longer walks and are created to the scale of 1 inch to 1,250 feet, or a little less than a quarter of a mile per inch. So put on your most comfortable shoes, pack some sunscreen, choose a few cards, and hit the ground walking— New York City awaits! ca ai m Ja East New York e. Av . wy Pk n e Canarsie Ro b o ins Lo Flatbush Crown Heights Greenwood 45 Brooklyn Botanic Garden Prospect Park 44 Park Slope 46 Upper New York Bay Governors Island 50 Statue of Liberty 49 Red Hook 41 2 Ellis Island Atl ant ic Ave . BROOKLYN dw oa Br BedfordStuyvesant M yr tl e 42 DUMBO 40 5 4 Financial 1 7 SoHo East 9 12 Side 10 TriBeCa 11 13 3 6 Chinatown 14 Lower 18 8 Greenwich 16 Village 17 Brooklyn Heights 47 Fort Greene 43 Cobble Hill A ve . g 48 in sh o ro B 15 Williamsburg u -Q yn kl Flu E s n ee Greenpoint ay Bushwick Met ropo litan Ave . . wy wn E xp dto s M i Union Square 20 19 Woodhaven ant v ic A e. Forest Park At l y. pw x d E an Isl ng Elmhurst QUEENS s B lv d . Q ue en Queen . 23 St th 30 22 Chelsea Hoboken MANHATTAN Times 25 26 Square 24 29 28 21 Union City Forest Hills Flushing Meadow Corona . ve ve l t A Jackson Heights . N or t h ern Bl vd Astoria Roose . ri a B lv d A s to e n t ral d C P an Upper East Side 32 30 33 35 Gr La Guardia Airport Ditmars Roosevelt Island th 38 East Harlem . St h 12 37 5t 110 Upper West Side Woodstock BRONX 36 Exp wy . Bronx Zoo Hunts Point r C ro ss B ro nx c ve Fordham ru d Ri Inwood B 31 Hu so n e. Washington Heights Av University n Morningside Heights Harlem Columbia so St Riverside . Park Central 34 Park Midtown 27 NYC Morris Park M ad i Fort Tryon Park . 39 St Fort Lee st George Washington Bridge 21 y. Palisades Park y. NEW JERSEY us w w Ridgefield an xp er xp N ew J e rse y T rn pke. Teaneck ow e. G Av y. a sh pw . E as t R ive r Fl u tb Ex ve y. A kn E Chronicle Books LLC 680 Second Street San Francisco, CA 94107 www.chroniclebooks.com M a j o r D e e g a n E x p w y. kw i Design by Michael Morris 29. The Met and Central Park (The Great Lawn and the Ramble) 30. A Magical Trio: The Guggenheim Museum, the CooperHewitt, and the Central Park Reservoir 31. Madison Avenue 32. The Upper West Side 33. Riverside Park 3 4. Columbia University 35. Harlem, Part 1 36. Harlem, Part 2 37. Harlem, Part 3 (Today’s Harlem) 38. The Cloisters and Fort Tryon Park 39. Brooklyn: DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) 40. Williamsburg 41. The Brooklyn Bridge Park Greenway 42. Brooklyn Heights 43. Brooklyn: Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens 4 4. Brooklyn: Farmers’ Market, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Botanic Garden 45. Brooklyn: Prospect Park 46. Brooklyn: Park Slope 47. Fort Greene 48. Bushwick 49. Red Hook 50. Governors Island ck ISBN 978-1-4521-6244-7 (deck) ISBN 978-1-4521-6557-8 (epub, mobi) 1. Battery Park 2. Wall Street 3. Ground Zero and The Freedom Tower 4. South Street Seaport 5. Brooklyn Bridge 6. City Hall 7. TriBeCa 8. SoHo 9. NoLita 10. Little Italy 11. Chinatown 12. Lower East Side, Part 1 13. Lower East Side, Part 2 14. East Village 15. Greenwich Village, Part 1 16. Greenwich Village, Part 2 17. Greenwich Village, Part 3 18. The Meatpacking District 19. Chelsea 20. The High Line 21. Union Square 22. Midtown Landmarks 1: Empire State Building, Morgan Library, and the United Nations 23. Midtown Landmarks 2: Grand Central Station, Bryant Park, and the New York Public Library 24. Times Square 25. Rockefeller Center 26. MoMA and Fifth Avenue 27. Central Park: Kid Zone 28. Central Park: 72nd Street to the Frick Ja K E Y T O NE W YOR K WA L K S M A P Text © 2018 Christina Henry de Tessan Maps © 2018 Lohnes + Wright All rights reserved. No part of this deck may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. All City Walks decks are independently researched. Our authors accept no payments or discounts in exchange for listing or endorsing any place or business. The information in this deck is updated regularly. However, as things can change quickly, if you notice anything out of date, feel free to contact us at [email protected] ca ai m Ja East New York e. Av . wy Pk n e Canarsie Ro b o ins Lo Flatbush Crown Heights Greenwood 45 Brooklyn Botanic Garden Prospect Park 44 Park Slope 46 Upper New York Bay Governors Island 50 Statue of Liberty 49 Red Hook 41 2 Ellis Island Atl ant ic Ave . BROOKLYN dw oa Br BedfordStuyvesant M yr tl e 42 DUMBO 40 5 4 Financial 1 7 SoHo East 9 12 Side 10 TriBeCa 11 13 3 6 Chinatown 14 Lower 18 8 Greenwich 16 Village 17 Brooklyn Heights 47 Fort Greene 43 Cobble Hill A ve . g 48 in sh o ro B 15 Williamsburg u -Q yn kl Flu E s n ee Greenpoint ay Bushwick Met ropo litan Ave . . wy wn E xp dto s M i Union Square 20 19 Woodhaven ant v ic A e. Forest Park At l y. pw x d E an Isl ng Elmhurst QUEENS s B lv d . Q ue en Queen . 23 St th 30 22 Chelsea Hoboken MANHATTAN Times 25 26 Square 24 29 28 21 Union City Forest Hills Flushing Meadow Corona . ve ve l t A Jackson Heights . N or t h ern Bl vd Astoria Roose . ri a B lv d A s to e n t ral d C P an Upper East Side 32 30 33 35 Gr La Guardia Airport Ditmars Roosevelt Island th 38 East Harlem . St h 12 37 5t 110 Upper West Side Woodstock BRONX 36 Exp wy . Bronx Zoo Hunts Point r C ro ss B ro nx c ve Fordham ru d Ri Inwood B 31 Hu so n e. Washington Heights Av University n Morningside Heights Harlem Columbia so St Riverside . Park Central 34 Park Midtown 27 NYC Morris Park M ad i Fort Tryon Park . 39 St Fort Lee st George Washington Bridge 21 y. Palisades Park y. NEW JERSEY us w w Ridgefield an xp er xp N ew J e rse y T rn pke. Teaneck ow e. G Av y. a sh pw . E as t R ive r Fl u tb Ex ve y. A kn E Chronicle Books LLC 680 Second Street San Francisco, CA 94107 www.chroniclebooks.com M a j o r D e e g a n E x p w y. kw i Design by Michael Morris 29. The Met and Central Park (The Great Lawn and the Ramble) 30. A Magical Trio: The Guggenheim Museum, the CooperHewitt, and the Central Park Reservoir 31. Madison Avenue 32. The Upper West Side 33. Riverside Park 3 4. Columbia University 35. Harlem, Part 1 36. Harlem, Part 2 37. Harlem, Part 3 (Today’s Harlem) 38. The Cloisters and Fort Tryon Park 39. Brooklyn: DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) 40. Williamsburg 41. The Brooklyn Bridge Park Greenway 42. Brooklyn Heights 43. Brooklyn: Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens 4 4. Brooklyn: Farmers’ Market, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Botanic Garden 45. Brooklyn: Prospect Park 46. Brooklyn: Park Slope 47. Fort Greene 48. Bushwick 49. Red Hook 50. Governors Island ck ISBN 978-1-4521-6244-7 (card deck) ISBN 978-1-4521-6557-8 (epub 2) 1. Battery Park 2. Wall Street 3. Ground Zero and The Freedom Tower 4. South Street Seaport 5. Brooklyn Bridge 6. City Hall 7. TriBeCa 8. SoHo 9. NoLita 10. Little Italy 11. Chinatown 12. Lower East Side, Part 1 13. Lower East Side, Part 2 14. East Village 15. Greenwich Village, Part 1 16. Greenwich Village, Part 2 17. Greenwich Village, Part 3 18. The Meatpacking District 19. Chelsea 20. The High Line 21. Union Square 22. Midtown Landmarks 1: Empire State Building, Morgan Library, and the United Nations 23. Midtown Landmarks 2: Grand Central Station, Bryant Park, and the New York Public Library 24. Times Square 25. Rockefeller Center 26. MoMA and Fifth Avenue 27. Central Park: Kid Zone 28. Central Park: 72nd Street to the Frick Ja K E Y T O NE W YOR K WA L K S M A P Text © 2018 Christina Henry de Tessan Maps © 2018 Lohnes + Wright All rights reserved. No part of this deck may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. All City Walks decks are independently researched. Our authors accept no payments or discounts in exchange for listing or endorsing any place or business. The information in this deck is updated regularly. However, as things can change quickly, if you notice anything out of date, feel free to contact us at [email protected] ca ai m Ja East New York e. Av . wy Pk n e Canarsie Ro b o ins Lo Flatbush Crown Heights Greenwood 45 Brooklyn Botanic Garden Prospect Park 44 Park Slope 46 Upper New York Bay Governors Island 50 Statue of Liberty 49 Red Hook 41 2 Ellis Island Atl ant ic Ave . BROOKLYN dw oa Br BedfordStuyvesant M yr tl e 42 DUMBO 40 5 4 Financial 1 7 SoHo East 9 12 Side 10 TriBeCa 11 13 3 6 Chinatown 14 Lower 18 8 Greenwich 16 Village 17 Brooklyn Heights 47 Fort Greene 43 Cobble Hill A ve . g 48 in sh o ro B 15 Williamsburg u -Q yn kl Flu E s n ee Greenpoint ay Bushwick Met ropo litan Ave . . wy wn E xp dto s M i Union Square 20 19 Woodhaven ant v ic A e. Forest Park At l y. pw x d E an Isl ng Elmhurst QUEENS s B lv d . Q ue en Queen . 23 St th 30 22 Chelsea Hoboken MANHATTAN Times 25 26 Square 24 29 28 21 Union City Forest Hills Flushing Meadow Corona . ve ve l t A Jackson Heights . N or t h ern Bl vd Astoria Roose . ri a B lv d A s to e n t ral d C P an Upper East Side 32 30 33 35 Gr La Guardia Airport Ditmars Roosevelt Island th 38 East Harlem . St h 12 37 5t 110 Upper West Side Woodstock BRONX 36 Exp wy . Bronx Zoo Hunts Point r C ro ss B ro nx c ve Fordham ru d Ri Inwood B 31 Hu so n e. Washington Heights Av University n Morningside Heights Harlem Columbia so St Riverside . Park Central 34 Park Midtown 27 NYC Morris Park M ad i Fort Tryon Park . 39 St Fort Lee st George Washington Bridge 21 y. Palisades Park y. NEW JERSEY us w w Ridgefield an xp er xp N ew J e rse y T rn pke. Teaneck ow e. G Av y. a sh pw . E as t R ive r Fl u tb Ex ve y. A kn E Chronicle Books LLC 680 Second Street San Francisco, CA 94107 www.chroniclebooks.com M a j o r D e e g a n E x p w y. kw i Design by Michael Morris 29. The Met and Central Park (The Great Lawn and the Ramble) 30. A Magical Trio: The Guggenheim Museum, the CooperHewitt, and the Central Park Reservoir 31. Madison Avenue 32. The Upper West Side 33. Riverside Park 3 4. Columbia University 35. Harlem, Part 1 36. Harlem, Part 2 37. Harlem, Part 3 (Today’s Harlem) 38. The Cloisters and Fort Tryon Park 39. Brooklyn: DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) 40. Williamsburg 41. The Brooklyn Bridge Park Greenway 42. Brooklyn Heights 43. Brooklyn: Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens 4 4. Brooklyn: Farmers’ Market, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Botanic Garden 45. Brooklyn: Prospect Park 46. Brooklyn: Park Slope 47. Fort Greene 48. Bushwick 49. Red Hook 50. Governors Island ck ISBN 978-1-4521-6244-7 (card deck) ISBN 978-1-4521-6557-8 (epub 2) 1. Battery Park 2. Wall Street 3. Ground Zero and The Freedom Tower 4. South Street Seaport 5. Brooklyn Bridge 6. City Hall 7. TriBeCa 8. SoHo 9. NoLita 10. Little Italy 11. Chinatown 12. Lower East Side, Part 1 13. Lower East Side, Part 2 14. East Village 15. Greenwich Village, Part 1 16. Greenwich Village, Part 2 17. Greenwich Village, Part 3 18. The Meatpacking District 19. Chelsea 20. The High Line 21. Union Square 22. Midtown Landmarks 1: Empire State Building, Morgan Library, and the United Nations 23. Midtown Landmarks 2: Grand Central Station, Bryant Park, and the New York Public Library 24. Times Square 25. Rockefeller Center 26. MoMA and Fifth Avenue 27. Central Park: Kid Zone 28. Central Park: 72nd Street to the Frick Ja K E Y T O NE W YOR K WA L K S M A P Text © 2018 Christina Henry de Tessan Maps © 2018 Lohnes + Wright All rights reserved. No part of this deck may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. All City Walks decks are independently researched. Our authors accept no payments or discounts in exchange for listing or endorsing any place or business. The information in this deck is updated regularly. However, as things can change quickly, if you notice anything out of date, feel free to contact us at [email protected] ca ai m Ja East New York e. Av . wy Pk n e Canarsie Ro b o ins Lo Flatbush Crown Heights Greenwood 45 Brooklyn Botanic Garden Prospect Park 44 Park Slope 46 Upper New York Bay Governors Island 50 Statue of Liberty 49 Red Hook 41 2 Ellis Island Atl ant ic Ave . BROOKLYN dw oa Br BedfordStuyvesant M yr tl e 42 DUMBO 40 5 4 Financial 1 7 SoHo East 9 12 Side 10 TriBeCa 11 13 3 6 Chinatown 14 Lower 18 8 Greenwich 16 Village 17 Brooklyn Heights 47 Fort Greene 43 Cobble Hill A ve . g 48 in sh o ro B 15 Williamsburg u -Q yn kl Flu E s n ee Greenpoint ay Bushwick Met ropo litan Ave . . wy wn E xp dto s M i Union Square 20 19 Woodhaven ant v ic A e. Forest Park At l y. pw x d E an Isl ng Elmhurst QUEENS s B lv d . Q ue en Queen . 23 St th 30 22 Chelsea Hoboken MANHATTAN Times 25 26 Square 24 29 28 21 Union City Forest Hills Flushing Meadow Corona . ve ve l t A Jackson Heights . N or t h ern Bl vd Astoria Roose . ri a B lv d A s to e n t ral d C P an Upper East Side 32 30 33 35 Gr La Guardia Airport Ditmars Roosevelt Island th 38 East Harlem . St h 12 37 5t 110 Upper West Side Woodstock BRONX 36 Exp wy . Bronx Zoo Hunts Point r C ro ss B ro nx c ve Fordham ru d Ri Inwood B 31 Hu so n e. Washington Heights Av University n Morningside Heights Harlem Columbia so St Riverside . Park Central 34 Park Midtown 27 NYC Morris Park M ad i Fort Tryon Park . 39 St Fort Lee st George Washington Bridge 21 y. Palisades Park y. NEW JERSEY us w w Ridgefield an xp er xp N ew J e rse y T rn pke. Teaneck ow e. G Av y. a sh pw . E as t R ive r Fl u tb Ex ve y. A kn E Chronicle Books LLC 680 Second Street San Francisco, CA 94107 www.chroniclebooks.com M a j o r D e e g a n E x p w y. kw i Design by Michael Morris 29. The Met and Central Park (The Great Lawn and the Ramble) 30. A Magical Trio: The Guggenheim Museum, the CooperHewitt, and the Central Park Reservoir 31. Madison Avenue 32. The Upper West Side 33. Riverside Park 3 4. Columbia University 35. Harlem, Part 1 36. Harlem, Part 2 37. Harlem, Part 3 (Today’s Harlem) 38. The Cloisters and Fort Tryon Park 39. Brooklyn: DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) 40. Williamsburg 41. The Brooklyn Bridge Park Greenway 42. Brooklyn Heights 43. Brooklyn: Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens 4 4. Brooklyn: Farmers’ Market, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Botanic Garden 45. Brooklyn: Prospect Park 46. Brooklyn: Park Slope 47. Fort Greene 48. Bushwick 49. Red Hook 50. Governors Island ck ISBN 978-1-4521-6244-7 (card deck) ISBN 978-1-4521-6557-8 (epub 2) 1. Battery Park 2. Wall Street 3. Ground Zero and The Freedom Tower 4. South Street Seaport 5. Brooklyn Bridge 6. City Hall 7. TriBeCa 8. SoHo 9. NoLita 10. Little Italy 11. Chinatown 12. Lower East Side, Part 1 13. Lower East Side, Part 2 14. East Village 15. Greenwich Village, Part 1 16. Greenwich Village, Part 2 17. Greenwich Village, Part 3 18. The Meatpacking District 19. Chelsea 20. The High Line 21. Union Square 22. Midtown Landmarks 1: Empire State Building, Morgan Library, and the United Nations 23. Midtown Landmarks 2: Grand Central Station, Bryant Park, and the New York Public Library 24. Times Square 25. Rockefeller Center 26. MoMA and Fifth Avenue 27. Central Park: Kid Zone 28. Central Park: 72nd Street to the Frick Ja K E Y T O NE W YOR K WA L K S M A P Text © 2018 Christina Henry de Tessan Maps © 2018 Lohnes + Wright All rights reserved. No part of this deck may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. All City Walks decks are independently researched. Our authors accept no payments or discounts in exchange for listing or endorsing any place or business. The information in this deck is updated regularly. However, as things can change quickly, if you notice anything out of date, feel free to contact us at [email protected] 1 B AT T E RY PA R K Battery Park is where New York got its start, and the area is home to a surprising number of interesting specialty museums and several memorials. Although the park itself is a bit small and overrun with tourists, it is densely packed with sites of historical significance. Take the 4/5 train to Bowling Green. Before you start, check out the map at the park entrance that points out all of the memorials (there are more than 20—too many to list here) in case there are any in particular you’d like to visit. Then head south along the main path, past the Netherland Memorial to the Peace Sphere (1), which was once situated in the World Trade Center Plaza and was brought here after 9/11. You’ll then pass the Immigrants Memorial (2), in memory of the many people who have disembarked here over the centuries. Up ahead is Castle Clinton (3), built in 1811 to defend New York harbor. (Today it’s a visitor center where you can purchase ferry tickets for the Statue of Liberty.) Head right, past the Korean War Memorial (4) and Pier A to enter Robert F. Wagner Park. Visit the Museum of Jewish Heritage (5; 36 Battery Pl.) or head across the street to the Skyscraper Museum (6; #39), where visitors can get a crash course in New York’s architectural history through photos, models, and architectural drawings. Continue along Battery Pl. to the National Museum of the American Indian (7; One Bowling Green), a Smithsonian outpost filled with a diverse collection of artifacts, photos, and art. Catch the subway back at Bowling Green, or continue south to catch the scenic free ferry to Staten Island. St. NYC ic h n S t. enw ty Pl . Gre ini al r S t. W cto M Rector St. Ba tte ry Pl . So ut Re Tr hE n d Av gto Pl. r P l. shin tor cto e. Re St. Wa Rec any We s t St . We st S t. A lb Hudson River oa St. ich N ew . enw 7 Wh ite ha ll St. S t. Battery Park St Beaver St. S ta te 2 dw ay St. ton Gre 1 3 ris M Bowling Green Ba tte ry Pl. 4 or Br St. M h in g Wa s S t. We s t We Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park st S t. 6 st S t. t P l. le W e 1s Litt 5 M Rector St. Bri dg e St. t. rl S Pea Wa ter South Ferry Station M Sou Whitehall Ferry Terminal St. t. th S 2 WA L L S T R E E T This stroll showcases a number of historic landmarks that played a crucial role in the evolution of the city during its early years. Take the 4/5 train to Bowling Green. Head south on State Plaza, looping around to the left. State St. runs into Water St. On your right, wedged between two towering skyscrapers, is the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (1; 55 Water), an understated but moving tribute that displays the names of all the New Yorkers who lost their lives in the war and includes a selection of quotes. Cross Water St. and head north on Coenties Slip. Turn left to visit Fraunces Tavern (2; 54 Pearl), a reconstruction of the historic pub favored by George Washington. (History buffs should check out the small museum here.) Backtrack, turn left on Coenties, then right onto charming Stone St., the first paved street in New York, which dates back to 1657. Today, the Stone Street Historic District (3) is packed with upscale restaurant tables, but plaques provide details about the area’s early days. Stone St. dead-ends at the British Memorial Garden. Head through the garden to Wall St. and turn left. Budding capitalists should visit the Museum of Finance (4; #48). History was made when George Washington was inaugurated in 1789 at the Federal Hall National Memorial (5; #26). The famed New York Stock Exchange (6; #11) occupies a surprisingly small building. Continue on to Trinity Church (7), straight ahead. When built, it was the tallest building in the city. Stroll through the picturesque old cemetery. Catch the 4/5 train at the Wall St. station out front. . St u W ch . l S t. ge ut D W ill P Louise la tt Nevelson S Plaza t. Ce Wall St. M da Pi M r ne 4 Pl. St St Ne an . ia al . m sa oa St Br ris Ex w S t. d S S. W ill i am St e on . St Hanover Square al W l S t. S O ld Sl ld ip lip S ie 2 nt s St. Sl ip ter nt O oe Wa t. rl S F ro 3 C ll St . Pea 1 Fr an k en lin D .R o at . er S t. t. . St . th Dr u t l S o ve e os South Ferry M Station St. Sou Ln . t. B S t. e av e r ai . W Bowling Green M Bro ad St. St. or ich enw Gre . dw ay M Broad St. W hi te ha State St. St as N 5 6 Battery Park y Financial District Wall St. M M rt . 7 Rector St. M St St . be . St Li St ar Ln . ch ay dw ty Tr ini Gre Br Pl . enw oa ich gto St. n S t. We s t St . We s t St . shin ed n r S t NYC de Wa C hn ai cto Jo M Re Zuccotti Park th Whitehall Ferry Terminal East River 3 G R OUND Z E R O A ND T HE F R E E DOM T O W E R After enduring many years as a construction zone, Ground Zero is now a sober, moving, and beautiful tribute to 9/11. Take the 1/2/3 train to the Chambers St. station. Behind you is diminutive St. Paul’s Church and Cemetery (1), which stands in almost shocking contrast to the modern skyscrapers that tower all around it. Despite its proximity to Ground Zero, the historic landmark (which dates back to 1766) survived the 9/11 attacks unscathed. The church served as an improvised place for rescue workers to rest. Head into and across the Oculus (2) a mall and transportation hub whose gleaming white steel ribs are meant to represent a dove in flight. Exit into the plaza. The National September 11 Memorial Museum (3) is ahead of you. Turn left to make your way to the South Pool (4), where you’ll find some of the names of the nearly 3,000 victims inscribed along the outer edge. Continue south to the elevated Liberty Park (5), which contains a sapling from the chestnut tree that Anne Frank used to admire from the attic when she was in hiding in Amsterdam during World War II. Loop back down and head north. Marvel at the Survivor Tree (6), which was severely damaged during the attacks but restored to life and returned here in 2010. Then continue on to the North Pool (7) and over to the Freedom Tower/One World Trade Center (8; 285 Fulton). The “Sky Pod” elevator covers several centuries of New York history in seconds as it whisks you 100 floors up to the observatory, where you’ll enjoy jaw-dropping views of Manhattan and beyond. Afterward, return to the Oculus to catch the train. Th Av e. Washington Market Park . dw oa t B r Pa rk City Hall Br Park Place M oa ur y n St St Pa . Fulton St. M A u St . n t. ut S St h sa Jo t S t. D ty St . Pl at t St . W ill er St ib . Financial District L Br . St ch nd Pi St nn as la m ay oa dw Pl ty ini Wall St. M w . . Zuccotti Park d r S t. Ro rk . se 1 N rt . oa cto . City Hall M Ch lto . St Br Re St . St ch rty Tr St. ich . enw St rs . . . St. be ur Li Co Ch r S t. le Fu Cortland St. D ey M St 5 rlis St ia S t. W e st 6 2 Gre Ca . Ve 3 4 any St M n St . Chambers St. M 7 Alb re be e ch Pl 8 da y Chambers St. Silverstein Family Park Ce r ra ar am ad . ay St Ch es Mu lay St St dw rc e as . Ba . an St St S t. y W e st se Re W W Ve Du ay h St . n w ic Gree No rt h W e st S t. W e st S t. En d TriBeCa om ne St . Ce da r St . NYC 4 S OU T H S T R E E T S E A P OR T This historic district has a long and colorful history as a bustling center of trade and commerce (which you may learn about in more detail at the museum mentioned below). Today, it’s a bustling twentyfirst-century mecca of shopping, high-end dining, and entertainment, along with a few historic ships for good measure and splendid views of the Brooklyn Bridge. Take the 2/3/4/5 train to the Fulton St. station and walk east a couple of blocks along the not-very-picturesque Fulton St. to the Seaport. As you approach the shopping center, the white lighthouse (1) to your left is a memorial to those who perished aboard the Titanic. To the left of the memorial is Bowne & Co. Stationers (2; 211 Water), a stationery shop specializing in letterpress that has been restored to look as it did in the 1870s. Return to the main drag and head toward the water. Amid the shops you’ll find the South Street Seaport Museum (3), which offers a good explanation of the seaport’s crucial role in the fledgling city’s economy. The Fulton Stall Market (4; 207A Front) is home to an indoor (and seasonally outdoor) market, where you’ll find loads of organic gourmet treats. Farther down Front is the delightfully low-key Jack’s Stir Brew (5; 222 Front) if you need a place to refuel. Backtrack to Fulton and turn left. You’ll pass the iPic Theaters (6) on your left, a deluxe cinema that serves food and cocktails while you watch. Head down to Pier 16 (7) to view the historic ships and enjoy some fine views of Brooklyn Heights and DUMBO. (Consider hopping a ferry here for a scenic ride across the river.) Then check out the gleaming retail and entertainment space on Pier 17 (8). Return to the subway via Fulton St. M City Brooklyn Bridge oa rk Br Pa f .o th e St St . o . S t. . . St St rl m . St ld Go ea P ia ill . W St t. nt St u So 3 . th St . South Street Seaport St . S er o Fr he at er ge ov 4 . 2 5 . ip Sl p ck Sli Pe ck Pe 1 tc r nt St . G o t. uv er ne a Fr nk lin t. ro S W S . St er St . F l St hn Ln Financial District al rl 6 . W a Pe at an . en W m d ek ai t. le St St S F ne r tt Jo Pi da . Be Ce M la St . P i ff St Cl . n St lto hn id D Fu Jo Br D n ly ut ok ch St M Fulton St . o Br St rt ol n d St . kf st n ne ra Fi . F an lto St . ve ce km . Fulton St M F u NYC A u ru sa Pace University Sp St as w M ad is on . St ee N nn Ro rk Printing House Square w Ro B A Pa G dw ay M Park Hall Place . t St el h v ut ose o S Ro . D 8 D r. 7 ur O Ln ld . Sl ip East River 5 BR OOK LY N BR IDG E The Brooklyn Bridge dramatically changed the New York landscape, literally and figuratively, allowing easy access across the East River. A stroll across this iconic landmark is both thrillingly beautiful and historical, an experience not to be missed. For the best views, you’ll begin this walk on the Brooklyn side and walk toward Manhattan. Take the A/C train to the High St. station. Head down the hill on Cadman Plaza E. (which turns into Washington St.). Turn right on Prospect St., cross beneath the freeway, and take an immediate right to reach the steps up to the Brooklyn Bridge walkway. As you make your way along the elevated pedestrian walkway (above the traffic), marvel at the neo-Gothic towers, the sparkling river, and the breathtaking Manhattan skyline. Keep an eye out for peregrine falcons that have taken to nesting on top of the towers. As you stroll, consider the following facts. Stretching almost 6,000 feet (a little over a mile), the Brooklyn Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world when it was completed in 1883, following thirteen arduous years of construction. It became a symbol of optimism and possibility, and remains one of New York’s most recognizable landmarks to this day. When it opened, the pedestrian toll was a penny (it actually costs less to walk across it now than it did in the 1800s!), and it cost 10 cents to drive a wagon across. To appreciate what a different era it was, consider that there were tolls for cows (5 cents) and sheep (2 cents) as well. In addition to its importance as a technical milestone, the bridge dramatically altered Brooklyn, whose population skyrocketed with the new bridge access. When you reach Manhattan, catch the J/M/Z or 4/5/6 train at the Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall station. t. . St e th St . . Pl m Ja S t. Sa in t e ri n e M on ro e S t. k F ra n y S t. Sout r S t. s . Roo li n D e v e lt h St. D r. nha Ma P Fu ec k lto . nB St ip tta Sl n ro rid B ge n ly hn ok Jo e dg East River Front St. e S t. St. ks rk St. St. M Clark St. Ra Cadman Plaza M Cadm an Plaz a E. St. Cla Hic nta St. Brooklyn l ow Wil Mo nge h S t. nry . y. O ra dag He Fu rm an St . Vin Mid Hts s E xpw bia um een Qu Col ynokl Bro 78 . ri B St South Street Seaport High St.Brooklyn Bridge ams St. rt G o ol kf d n Wa te St . Wa shin gto n St. ra St . F C h e rr R W ob ag e n rt e r F. St C a th t. er S Manhattan NYC . Pi ke St Brooklyn M Bridge . M ar ke t St Row Park es C tr St . Di vi sio n O li v City Hall en or Je ffe rs on W . St 6 CIT Y HALL Wander among a number of the city’s historical and more recent government buildings, and admire several contemporary and architectural landmarks along the way. Take the 4/5 train to Fulton St. Head north on Broadway, past St. Paul’s Church on your left, to the base of City Hall Park. To the left, at Barclay St., is the Woolworth Building (1; 233 Broadway), the world’s tallest when it was completed in 1913. Enter the park, where you’ll find a circular timeline depicting the city’s history from 1625. Stroll north to the fountain. Architecture buffs should turn right, exit the park, cross Park Row, and take Beekman to view New York by Gehry (2; 8 Spruce), a shimmering 76-story skyscraper, now one of the tallest residential buildings in the world, designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry. Return to the park fountain and continue north to admire diminutive City Hall (3), which at one time delineated the northernmost limit of the city. Exit onto Park Row, turn left, and re-enter the park along the path that runs between the north side of City Hall and the massive Tweed Courthouse (4). Turn right just beyond it to exit the park onto Chambers St. Cross Chambers, turn right, and turn left on Elk to reach the African Burial Ground National Monument (5), built to honor the more than 400 free and enslaved Africans who were buried here in the 1600s and 1700s, when this area lay outside the boundary of the city of New York City (then New Amsterdam). Return to Centre St. and turn right, past the gargantuan Municipal Building (6) to catch the J/M/Z train at the Chambers St. station.

Author Christina Henry de Tessan Isbn 9781452162447 File size 5.17MB Year 2018 Pages 50 Language English File format PDF Category Travel Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Featuring brand-new walks, neighborhoods, restaurants, shops, and more, this revised edition of the bestselling deck reveals New York’s best-kept secrets. Each card includes a full-color map, walking directions, and highlighted stopping points. Ideal for anyone who wants to make the most of NYC—be it transplant, traveler, or native!     Download (5.17MB) Thailand Travel Atlas The Rough Guide to New England, 5th Edition Rough Guide Directions Athens Frommer’s Bangkok day by day, 2nd Edition Frommer’s Beijing Day by Day Load more posts

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