Capture One Pro 9: Mastering Raw Development, Image Processing, and Asset Management by Sascha Erni


42583ab362a0349.jpg Author Sascha Erni
Isbn 9781937538811
File size 76MB
Year 2016
Pages 200
Language English
File format PDF
Category cinema


 

Sascha Erni is a freelance photojournalist and reporter. Since 2004, he has contributed images and stories to many popular agencies, newspapers, and magazines around the world. He authored his first non-fiction book Mac and iPad for Photographers in 2014. In his spare time, he writes fiction and practices fine art photography. Erni is a member of the Phase One Ambassador Program, which keeps him on the cutting edge of Capture One development. Erni lives, photographs, and writes in Switzerland. Sascha Erni Capture One Pro 9 Mastering Raw Development, Image Processing, and Asset Management Sascha Erni, http://www.saschaerni.com Project Editor: Jocelyn Howell Copyeditor: Elizabeth Welch Layout: Petra Strauch Cover Design: Rebecca Cowlin Printed in China ISBN 978-1-937538-81-1 1st Edition 2016 © 2016 by Sascha Erni Rocky Nook Inc. 802 East Cota St., 3rd Floor Santa Barbara, CA 93103 www.rockynook.com Library of Congress Control Number: 2015954471 Copyright © 2015 by dpunkt.verlag GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany. Title of the German original: Praxis Capture One Pro 8 ISBN 978-3-86490-245-1 Translation Copyright © 2016 by Rocky Nook. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright notice may be reproduced or utilized in any form, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission of the publisher. Many of the designations in this book used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks of their respective companies. Where those designations appear in this book, and Rocky Nook was aware of a trademark claim, the designations have been printed in caps or initial caps. All product names and services identified throughout this book are used in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of such companies with no intention of infringement of the trademark. They are not intended to convey endorsement or other affiliation with this book. While reasonable care has been exercised in the preparation of this book, the publisher and author(s) assume no responsibility for errors or omissions, or for damages resulting from the use of the information contained herein or from the use of the discs or programs that may accompany it. This book is printed on acid-free paper. All photographs and illustrations by the author. Table of Contents Preface and Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix How the Book Is Structured. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Software: How Does Capture One Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Basic Concepts and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Which Version Do I Need?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 An Overview of the Rendering Pipeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Color Management and ICC  /  ICM Profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 All about Panels, Tabs, and the Capture One Interface in General. 17 Default Settings for Cameras. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Program Preferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Global Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2 Hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 2.1 The Oldest Question in the Book: Mac or PC?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 2.2 Choosing the Right Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 2.3 Using Capture One with Multiple Computers or on a Network . . . 43 2.4 Graphics Tablets and Other Input Devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 2.5 ICC Profiles: The Importance of Profiling Your Monitor. . . . . . . . . . . 48 3 The Workflow Pipeline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 4 The Library Tool Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 4.1 Catalog, Session, or Both?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 4.2 Default Folders and Folder Structures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 4.3 The EIP File Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 4.4 Importing Images and Basic Organization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 4.5 User Collections and Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 4.6 Filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 4.7 Smart Albums. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 4.8 From a Session to a Catalog and Vice Versa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 4.9 XMP Files and Metadata. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 4.10 On the Safe Side: Backups and Integrity Checks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 4.11 Importing Catalogs from Lightroom, Media Pro, and Aperture. . . . 88 5 5.1 5.2 5.3 The Color Tool Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Base Characteristics: Rendering Engines, ICC Profiles, and Curves. 92 Histograms: Evaluate and Understand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 White Balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 v Table of Contents vi Table of Contents 5.4 Color Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 5.5 Black & White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 5.6 The Color Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 6 The Exposure Tool Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 6.1 The Basics: Contrast, Saturation, Brightness, and Exposure. . . . . . . 130 6.2 HDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 6.3 Understanding Levels and Curves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 6.4 The Clarity Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 6.5 The Vignetting Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 7 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 The Lens Correction Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Lens Corrections and Profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 The Movement Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Purple Fringing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 LCC Profiles—For More than Just Lens Correction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 8 The Composition Tool Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 8.1 Crop, Aspect Ratio, Grids, and Guides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 8.2 Rotate, Flip, and Straighten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 8.3 Keystone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 8.4 Overlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 9 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 The Details Tool Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 The Navigator and the Focus Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Input Sharpening. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Noise Reduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Single Pixel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Enhanced Noise Reduction: Details and Film Grain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Eliminating Moirés . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Dusty Sensors and Spot Removal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 10 The Local Adjustments Tool Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 10.1 Adjustment Layers and Masks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 10.2 Clone and Heal Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 11 11.1 11.2 11.3 The Adjustments Tool Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Styles and Presets: Basics and Differences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Saving, Copying, and Applying Presets and Styles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Organizing Styles and Presets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 12 12.1 12.2 12.3 The Metadata Tool Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Applying, Copying, and Deleting Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Working with Hierarchical and Nonhierarchical Keywords . . . . . . . 233 Metadata Compatibility and Third-Party Applications . . . . . . . . . . . 237 13 The Output and Batch Tool Tabs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 13.1 Creating and Managing Output  /  Process Recipes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 13.2 The Process Recipe Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 13.3 Output Location. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 13.4 Output Naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 13.5 The Batch Tool Tab: Queue and History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 14 Tethered Shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 14.1 Getting Started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 14.2 All About Tethered Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 14.3 Capture Location, Collections, and Naming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 14.4 Applying Automatic Adjustments during Capture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 14.5 Camera Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 14.6 Capture Pilot: Not Just for Studio Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 15 15.1 15.2 15.3 Using Capture One with Third-Party Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Image Databases and DAM Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Plug-ins, Photoshop, and Other Raw Developers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 Using AppleScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Appendix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 A.1 The Workflow Pipeline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 A.2 Other Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 vii Table of Contents viii Capture One Pro 9 Preface and Introduction Preface and Introduction Preface The title of this book says it all. Capture One Pro 9: Mastering Raw Development, Image Processing, and Asset Management is based on my many years of practical experience as a photographer and imaging specialist and, most important, on five years of hands-on experience earning a living with Capture One. Don’t worry—I’m not going to list the program’s features and explain them to death, and my book is neither an alternative to the user manual and online help provided by Phase One nor simply a collection of tutorials. And why is this so? Because Capture One is an evolving digital product with tools and functions that are constantly being refined, reevaluated and replaced. With the release of version 8, Phase One switched to a “rolling release” development model. This means that significant changes took place during version 8’s lifetime and more are sure to follow with version 9’s point-­ releases, so a collection of step-by-step tutorials in book form would quickly become outdated. The web is a much better medium for regular updates on technicalities and details, and the Phase One blog (http://blog.phaseone. com) does a great job of keeping users up to speed. My approach with this book is to provide you with the necessary foundation for you to learn to “think Capture One,” so to speak. Who This Book Is For and Why You Should Read It Capture One is an image-processing package that has developed over the course of many years, so it can take a while to come to grips with how it all fits together and learn to make the most of its fantastic features. It took me about a year to get up to speed; I know people who have been working with the program since version 4 who still have trouble with some of its basic concepts and occasionally end up frustrated because Capture One doesn’t behave the way they expect. And that’s exactly where this book comes in. Within its pages, you will find a wealth of tips, examples, and explanations that will help you dramatically reduce your learning curve. I want you to understand Capture One, not just learn how to use it. This book is no substitute for learning, practice, or working on your own images, and even when I mention a specific tool or the position of a particular button, what I’m really talking about is the thought processes behind them. How can you best approach the task at hand? How does tool “X” work and when is the best time to use it as part of your own personal workflow? This book is also aimed at photographers who want to switch programs, and especially those on the lookout for an alternative to Apple’s now defunct Aperture. If you belong to this group, you will already be familiar with concepts such as nondestructive processing and the creation of image copies. However, even though Capture One is broadly comparable to Aperture and offers robust import functionality for existing Aperture libraries, the two programs still work very differently. This book emphasizes these differences in many places and offers solutions to make the switch as painless as possible. The concepts you’ll encounter will help you get to know the program and speed up the process of delving into its inner workings. You won’t have to guess how processes work, experiment with countless settings, or send endless support questions to get the most out of this somewhat stubborn software because I’ve spent the last five years doing that for you! In short: This book isn’t an instruction manual, but rather a teaching aid and a tool to help you use Capture One Pro 9, and future releases, effectively. I hope you will find it interesting and enlightening—please let me know if it is. April 2015 Sascha Erni Twitter: @nggalai Acknowledgments A big thank you goes to my U.S. editor, Ted Waitt, and everyone at Rocky Nook for their patience during the preparation of this book. Because of my day job as a journalist and photographer, the book was a long time in the making, and I’m sure other publishers wouldn’t have been so flexible and understanding. I would also like to thank Phase One, and especially Tobias Kreusler, Gitte Maj Nielsen, James Johnson, and David Grover. Their friendliness and our close cooperation allowed me to get the early look at the beta versions of Capture One 8 and 9, which that was essential in getting this book off the ground. Last but not least, a huge thank you (and an apology) goes to everyone who had to live with me during the research and writing phases. You know who you are, even if you don’t know how much you helped! ix Acknowledgments x Capture One Pro 9 Preface and Introduction How the Book Is Structured Side notes like this appear at regular intervals. They are designed to help you decide whether a section is of particular interest and quickly locate sections you want to refer back to. Capture One Pro 9 consists of 15 chapters and an appendix. You can read it from end to end if you like, but it’s also designed to let you dive in and get help where you need it most. Cross-references guide you to related sections that go into more detail on the topic being discussed. To get you started and give you an idea of what’s in store, here’s a summary of the material addressed in the individual chapters. Chapter 1: Software: How Does Capture One Work? This chapter is all about the basics. How does Capture One work? What are the fundamental concepts on which it’s based? What exactly is Capture One, and when are you better off using other programs like Photoshop or PhotoLine? What do you have to watch out for when using the various versions, and how is the user interface put together? Chapter 2: Hardware This chapter addresses the question of optimizing your hardware to get the most out of Capture One, from graphics cards to Wacom pen tablets. It also talks about using Capture One in a network and what to watch out for if you use it on multiple devices—for example, on your laptop when you’re out and about as well as on your desktop computer at home. Chapter 3: The Workflow Pipeline Chapters 1 and 2 explain the terms you need to know and give you the knowledge you need to get started. Chapter 3 is where you really get going. The “workflow pipeline” is a concept that I’ll use to guide you through the book and the software. Many of the chapters start with a flowchart that shows the stage in the process that you and your images have reached. This chapter explains how your images “flow” through a raw converter and how the various tools involved interact. Chapter 4: The Library Tool Tab Capture One uses tabs to group tools, and chapters 4 through 15 discuss the individual tools in each tab. This chapter explains the difference between a catalog and a session, and introduces the Filters tool and Smart Albums. It also tells you all you need to know about asset management in Capture One. In addition, this chapter includes tips for readers making the switch from Aperture or Adobe Lightroom. Chapter 5: The Color Tool Tab Capture One handles color differently than Aperture and Lightroom, and this is one of the reasons it is so popular among studio photographers. This chapter discusses the basic concepts the program uses when dealing with color and introduces the White Point, Color Editor, and Color Balance tools that play such an important role in the overall workflow. We’ll also take a look at the various histograms and what they mean, and we’ll take an excursion into the world of black-and-white photography. Chapter 6: The Exposure Tool Tab Alongside the color question, the second major element of every raw converter is how it handles individual tonal values. This chapter explains how to correct exposure errors simply and effectively and how to use image flaws creatively. We’ll look at the difference between Curves and Levels, try out the HDR tool, and, as a prelude to chapter 9, we’ll take a first look at how to compose great-looking images. Chapter 7: The Lens Correction Tab This chapter is all about correcting lens errors such as barrel and pin-cushion distortion, chromatic aberrations, and purple fringing. You’ll also learn how to use Lens Cast Calibration (LCC) profiles to eliminate the effects of a dusty sensor. Chapter 8: The Composition Tool Tab Ideally, you will always compose great images that you can use straight out of the camera. However, you’ll often find that an adjustment or two is required—for example, when a wide-angle lens has produced too much distortion, a client needs a different aspect ratio, or the horizon isn’t quite straight. Chapter 8 covers all this and more. Chapter 9: The Details Tools Tab “Correct” sharpening is a topic of hot debate among photographers, and no two people have quite the same opinion about it. We’ll take a look at sharpening the Capture One way and explain how the Sharpening and Noise Reduction tools interact. You’ll also learn what the Clarity and Structure sliders do and delve into the magic of the Film Grain tool, which can do far more than just create analog-style looks. Chapter 10: The Local Adjustments Tool Tab Many of Capture One’s tools can be used “locally,” in only parts of an image rather than the whole file. Like with Photoshop adjustments, this creates an additional layer on which the corresponding adjustment is made in real time. This chapter looks at the benefits and the limitations of local adjustments and explains why the Clone and Heal controls in the Local Repair tool will probably get you firing up Photoshop less often than you used to. Chapter 11: The Adjustments Tool Tab Although its name is similar to the Local Adjustments tool tab, Style and Preset Management might be more appropriate. This chapter discusses how to create and save styles and presets and explains how to copy adjustments to other images and apply complete looks to batches of photos. xi How the Book Is Structured xii Capture One Pro 9 Preface and Introduction Chapter 12: The Metadata Tool Tab Metadata plays a significant role in the digital age. It is hard to imagine life without tags that tell us where and when a photo was captured, what it shows, who is in it, and how highly it is rated. This chapter introduces the types of metadata used by Capture One and shows how to use the information how you want to. We’ll discuss the potential pitfalls involved in swapping metadata between programs, and I’ll give you tips on how to build up your own system of tags. The aim here is to use the Capture One Pro catalog to sort and order your image archives once and for all. Chapter 13: The Output and Batch Tool Tabs This chapter covers two tabs. The Output tool tab is used to create copies of images for sharing online or with other applications, while the Batch tool tab lists the copies you’ve made. Here, you’ll learn how to work with multiple “output recipes” to create copies of different versions of an image. I’ll also explain where to look for errors if your output doesn’t end up looking the way you expect. Chapter 14: Tethered Shooting Capture One is designed from the ground up for use in Tethered Shooting mode, and this is the main reason the program exists in the first place. Catalogs, the Clone tool, and other details all came later. The best way to learn about tethered shooting is to plug in your camera and try it for yourself. This is why chapter 14 deals largely with the theory of preparing your camera and computer for a tethered session and leaves the practice to you. It also looks at saving and renaming image files and explains the role played by the Capture Pilot app for iPad and Android. Chapter 15: Using Capture One with Third-Party Software “No man is an island.” Poet John Donne’s assessment of the human condition is also true for most image-processing applications, which are of no use without additional database and digital asset management (DAM) software and often require the use of other programs or plug-ins. This chapter explores this aspect of the image creation process and explains how to reimport your images into the Capture One Library once you are done with your external processing steps. Appendix As mentioned in the preface, software evolves too fast for a book like this to be completely up to date, so in addition to a comprehensive index, the appendix includes a list of links to online material and suggestions for further reading to help you stay up to speed. 1 Software: How Does Capture One Work? Capture One Pro 9 is the current version of a raw developer that has proved itself in photographic studios over the course of more than a decade. It started life as an accessory program for Phase One’s medium-format digital backs and, over the years, has developed into a universal image-processing program for use with a wide range of cameras in all sorts of situations. However, Capture One still has its own particular focus and idiosyncrasies and isn’t particularly intuitive to use. This chapter addresses the underlying concepts that are most likely to cause problems for Capture One beginners and those switching from other, similar programs. Section 1.1 begins with a quick history lesson for those of you who have so far only heard about Capture One. If you’re already familiar with the program, you can move straight on to section 1.2, which is aimed at those who have an idea of what it’s all about but have yet to make a purchase decision. Capture One wasn’t originally designed as an all-in-one software solution. In studio, media, and publishing environments, images are usually processed in Photoshop before they’re handed over to some kind of layout software. Capture One was originally conceived to squeeze the best possible image quality out of Phase One’s own cameras while making life as simple as possible for the photographer. Today’s Capture One Pro is different from the original and, although its major strengths lie in professional studio shooting environments, the inclusion of support for an ever-expanding range of cameras has seen its target audience grow and grow. The toolset has moved away from its original raw developer  /  studio workflow base to encompass an expanding range of tools that include creative sharpening, selective processing, and spot removal—all functions that are traditionally handled by Photoshop. Version 7 saw the introduction of catalog functionality that is still not perfect but nevertheless covered many photographers’ DAM requirements. This only got better in versions 8 and 9. It’s important to keep the software’s origins in mind, especially if you’re used to the Lightroom  /  Aperture approach to image management and color profiles. The software’s name includes the word “capture,” which clearly indicates the most important aspect of how it works. It’s primarily designed for capturing photos that are immediately saved on a computer, so memory cards play a secondary, backup role in the Capture One workflow. The advantages of this approach are as follows: Capture One is not just another Lightroom or Aperture clone. Tethered photo capture and meticulous color management were long the cornerstones of the Capture One philosophy. 1  2 Capture One Pro 9 CHAPTER 1 Software: How Does Capture One Work? ff The art director in a team doesn’t have to wait until a memory card is full before development work on the raw files can begin. Every image is immediately available on the computer. ff If present at the shoot, the project leader or client can give immediate feedback on composition and lighting and doesn’t have to wait until later when the model has probably already left the building. ff You no longer have to remove the memory card from the camera, insert it into a card reader, and import your images. This saves a lot of time in situations that produce large numbers of extremely large files. The program’s focus on image capture sessions resulted in concepts like using a session as a project container for storing folder locations (see section 4.1) and managing images and sidecar files outside of a database using the Enhanced Image Package (EIP) file format (see section 4.3). In other words, the program takes a highly file-centric approach. Unlike Aperture and Lightroom, which were both designed around the catalog as their central element, Capture One’s catalog functionality was added later to the basic program framework. The studio photography workflow requires strict adherence to the International Color Consortium   /   Image Color Management (Windows) (ICC  /  ICM) color management guidelines. If you spend your time photographing fashion and jewelry using a camera that cost a five-figure sum, you’re probably producing work for magazines or advertising purposes. Capture One is designed with compatibility with various color models (RGB, CMYK, and so forth) in mind and has to be able to warn you at the raw development stage if your images exceed the color gamut of the planned output medium. It also has to deliver prepress-ready material without the use of third-party software. This approach is designed primarily with professional photographers in mind, but the benefits of a pro-grade workflow are nice to have for hobbyists and enthusiasts, too. Even if a pro workflow exceeds your initial needs, you’ll find it makes life a lot easier the more your imaging requirements grow. 1.1 Basic Concepts and Features 1.1 The basic Capture One concept: raw image data development followed by nondestructive processing of the resulting images Whatever you do with your images in Capture One, your original files remain unchanged. The program saves a log of all the adjustments you make and, in order to view, share, or publish a “finished” image, you have to output it using a process akin to making a print from an analog negative (see chapter 13). QUICK TIP To compare using Capture One with the creation of an analog photographic print is only half the story. The software not only enables you to make “prints” from “negatives,” it also enables you to keep your exposed “roll of film” and develop it again and again, however you wish. Although this isn’t possible using analog material, the simplified terms “negative” and “print” have become established in the digital world, too, and you’ll come across them regularly in the course of this book. In Capture One, a “finished” image exists in the form of the original image file and its accompanying develop settings, either in the form of a sidecar file or as part of a catalog. If you decide at some point to switch from Capture One to another image-processing platform and you want to retain all the adjustments you’ve made to your images, you’ll first have to make your develop settings a permanent part of the corresponding image files. If your computer should crash or be stolen, you’ll have access to your backup image files but not to the adjustments you’ve made. Many photographers avoid such a situation by making a JPEG or 16-bit TIFF copy of each processed image as a regular part of their everyday processing workflow. The format you use will depend on the level of quality you require and the amount of available disk space. Capture One is still “only” a raw developer at heart, although each version has seen the addition of tools and functions that used to be available only in programs like Photoshop. Capture One Pro can perform each of the following tasks at the raw development stage: ff Correct lens and perspective errors ff Eliminate the effects of dust on the sensor and the rear element of your lens ff Suppress the effects of sensor noise and hot pixels ff Apply basic and creative sharpening ff Process color data for a range of color spaces and color models ff Convert to black and white and make creative color adjustments ff Remove red-eye and retouch skin tone ff Add watermarks to images for online publishing ff Make individual prints and contact sheets ff Manage assets …and much more. Performing all these tasks at a raw level also means that you can combine multiple adjustments in any order without affecting the quality of the resulting image. For example, you can begin by reducing noise and sharpening before you correct lens errors and adjust the white point, Nondestructive processing means that images are only transformed into finished, output-ready files when you need them. Today’s Capture One is an all-in-one raw developer and image-processing package. The more processing steps you perform within Capture One, the less subsequent adjustments you’ll have to make to your finished images. 3 Basic Concepts and Features 4 Capture One Pro 9 CHAPTER 1 Software: How Does Capture One Work? or vice versa. Capture One applies adjustments directly to the original raw image data, which means that you can make selective changes to your adjustments later on, too. A Sample Process Let’s imagine you want to create a black-and-white version of an image using the Nik  /  Google SilverEfex software. Begin by creating the black-and white image file in Capture One and hand over a TIFF copy to SilverEfex, where you mess around with the tone curve a little, add a vignette, and set a color filter. You’re happy with the results and save it… 1.2 Oops! …only to discover online that you overlooked a blotch in the sky. You take a deep breath and remove the blotch in Capture One before starting over with your adjustments in SilverEfex. And then you realize that there are other specks you missed, or that you didn’t quite correct perspective properly, or that you don’t like the sepia tone you applied after all, and so on. Performing all of these steps in Capture One saves you a lot of time and effort. All you have to do is correct each error individually—your previous steps and any you made after the one you’re adjusting are preserved without affecting the quality of the finished image. This is the main reason for performing as many of your adjustments as possible at the raw development stage. You can, of course, use Photoshop layers to achieve similar effects, but taking this approach often produces extremely large files and makes processing slower. Some steps—for example, noise reduction and lens error corrections—cannot be adjusted later in Photo­shop. The moment you hand over a developed image to Photoshop, all the adjustments you’ve made so far become a permanent part of the image copy and can only be further adjusted if you’re prepared to accept a visible drop in image quality. The only other alternative is to start over. So which major processing steps can’t be performed in Capture One yet? The list is actually quite short: ff Panorama stitching and other types of merge ff Complex retouching and the cloning of image data from other images ff Automatic synchronization of images published at online sharing sites such as flickr and 500px ff Sharing of images using online services such as Twitter and Facebook Although it has some limitations that we’ll look into in more detail in the next chapter, the scaled-down Capture One Express (for Sony) handles raw image data just like the full-fledged program. The original data remains unchanged and you have to create copies of your images to output them. The more steps you perform within Capture One, the fewer adjustments you’ll have to make to your “finished” image. 1.2 Which Version Do I Need? This section is for those of you who haven’t yet decided which version of the program you need. The decision itself isn’t too difficult to make, but once you understand why a particular version and licensing model is the best for your particular purposes, you’ll significantly increase your chances of getting the very best out of the software. 1.2.1 A Question of Licensing As of version 8, you can either purchase Capture One outright or take out a subscription. However, unlike the Adobe CC model, which provides a comprehensive cloud environment and online disk space, the Capture One subscription model affects only how you actually pay for the software. Therefore, the first question you have to ask yourself is whether you prefer to buy or “rent” your software. Both models have their pros and cons. The Subscription Model A subscription gives you the right to always use the latest version of Capture One Pro. You don’t have to spend your entire life online to use this model— logging on once a month is sufficient to keep your subscription data up to date and synchronized with the Capture One servers. Capture One isn’t cheap, so a subscription will help you keep tabs on your expenses and spread the cost of using the software. The more licenses you require, the better value the subscription model offers. Purchasing 10 standard licenses costs almost twice as much as a one-year subscription for 10 users and has to be paid immediately, so a subscription model is especially practical for smaller studios on a limited budget. A subscription helps you keep your expenses under control. 5 Which Version Do I Need? 6 Capture One Pro 9 CHAPTER 1 Software: How Does Capture One Work? A subscription ties you to a specific vendor and forces you to upgrade. A single-user license is quite expensive. A full license makes you independent. If you haven’t decided whether Capture One is the right tool for you, you can try it for three or perhaps six months and, should you decide to use a different program after all, you can cancel your subscription at the end of any three-month period and save the difference in price between a full license and a few months’ tryout. A subscription has downsides, too. It ties you to Phase One for its duration, and perhaps more important, Capture One catalogs and adjustments cannot be read by other image-processing programs. This means that if you cancel your subscription, you’ll either have to reprocess your images or create copies for use with your new software. You’ll also have to re-create your catalogs manually. The subscription servers don’t allow you to keep an expired version of the software on your computer even if you only occasionally need to create an image copy. If, for example, you find that a successful sequence of images that you made using Capture One has gotten lost or broken, you’ll have to take out a fresh three-month subscription in order to export your images along with the adjustments you made. The only alternative in this case is to reprocess all your images using your new software. System requirements can also cause trouble. The Mac version of Capture One 9 requires OS X 10.10 or later, so users of OS X 10.9 or earlier simply cannot use it. Similarly, the PC version requires a 64-bit OS, so users sticking with 32-bit are out of luck. If future versions of the software are only compatible with certain versions of an operating system or require a specific minimum level of graphics power, you may find you have to update or even replace your computer to match, thus making it impossible to stick to a familiar running version. Standard Full Licenses Phase One is not planning to switch to a subscription-only licensing model, and standard licenses, too, offer certain advantages and disadvantages. As already mentioned, Capture One is not particularly cheap, and even an upgrade can cost more than a full license for a competitive product. Over the years, using this model can cost a significant amount of money, so it’s worth taking a close look at your needs, especially if you use multiple licenses. Purchasing a full license makes you independent of future developments. This means if you were happy with version 8, you don’t have to upgrade to subsequent versions as they become available. If you find that version “X” no longer works with your computer or you want to use an older version to maintain your image archives, your “perpetual license” (as Phase One calls it) does the job. Freelancers and imaging studios often spend years optimizing their workflows and setting up hardware and software to suit their style of work and can’t (or don’t want to) update to the latest version. IMPORTANT Full and subscription licenses fulfill different purposes and neither model is “better” than the other. Rather than making a gut decision, take a careful look at your workflow, the hardware and software you use, and your available budget, and work out how much each model will cost over the next two or three years. Consider, too, how often you’ve upgraded in the past and whether you tend to skip some versions. Try to remain objective at this stage and only allow your instincts to take over once you’ve made that basic decision. 1.2.2 Which Version Is Right for Me? With the introduction of Capture One 8, the question of which version to use became a lot simpler to answer, as there was only one choice for most users: Capture One Pro 8. All earlier versions were eligible for an upgrade to Capture One Pro 8 for the same price—i.e., the upgrade from Capture One Pro 4 to Pro 8 cost the same as the upgrade from Pro 7 to Pro 8. With Capture One Pro 9, though, the scope of eligible versions was reduced to versions 7 and 8—i.e., if you want to upgrade to version 9 now, you need to already own a version 7 or 8 license. If you are upgrading from an earlier version, such as Capture One Pro 6, you are required to buy a full license. Supposedly Phase One decided on the wide scope with the introduction of Capture One Pro 8 to get as many users as possible on the same page. With the release of version 9, it’s as simple as that: two versions down? Upgrade possible. Older version? New license needed. Capture One Pro and Capture One Express  /   Pro for Sony—choosing the right version is simple. 1.3 The first time you start Capture One you have to choose which version to activate. The download file is always the same, but different sets of functions are activated according to the version you select. 7 Which Version Do I Need? 8 Capture One Pro 9 CHAPTER 1 Software: How Does Capture One Work? Users of Sony’s a7 series cameras are a special case and have the option of using a cheaper Express version of the software that only supports a7 cameras. Look at it as if this version of the software was bundled with the camera you bought, but you need to download it. This version has no session mode and limited layer functionality. It doesn’t support tethered shooting (see chapter 14), and the Lens Correction tab contains fewer options than the full Pro version. Sony users can also opt to use the full Pro version “for Sony,” which, like the Express version, only supports Sony cameras and their proprietary file formats, and is a lot cheaper than the regular Pro version. The Express version for Sony is similar to earlier Express versions and can be upgraded to the full Capture One Pro just like other Capture One 6 and 7 Express licenses. For the sake of completeness, I also need to mention the DB and Cultural Heritage versions of Capture One 9. DB stands for Digital Back and is optimized for use with Phase One and Mamiya Leaf medium-format digital backs. This free version has functionality identical to that of the standard version of Capture One Pro but, like the Sony version, only supports the cameras it is delivered with. The Cultural Heritage version is optimized for reproduction photography in museums and other archiving situations. It, too, has the same functionality as the regular Capture One but also offers extended support from Phase One and a range of support contracts that include additional hardware and software. Neither of these special versions is available on the open market and won’t be mentioned again in the course of the book. 1.3 For the purposes of this book we’ll call the process of converting raw image data into a human-readable image “rendering.” An Overview of the Rendering Pipeline In principle, Capture One works just like any other raw developer. It reads the raw image data, interprets it, and transforms it into an image that can be viewed by humans. Chapter 3 discusses in detail how your image files pass through the various modules that make up the Capture One “workflow pipeline,” but for now we’ll concentrate on a more fundamental question, namely: How does Capture One know the color of a model’s hair or the precise shade of green produced by the rising sun shining on a meadow? This section introduces the “rendering pipeline” and will help you understand how Capture One works.

Author Sascha Erni Isbn 9781937538811 File size 76MB Year 2016 Pages 200 Language English File format PDF Category Cinema Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Historically, Capture One Pro software has been regarded primarily as an amazing RAW file converter for high-end cameras. With its newest release, Capture One Pro 9 goes well beyond its storied RAW conversions to become one of the most powerful image-processing applications on the market, addressing the imaging workflow from capture to print. Version 9 has also been optimized to support many of the most popular cameras being used today. With an abundance of new features and the promise of producing vastly superior images, photographers of all skill levels are giving Capture One Pro a try. Of course, along with expanded functionality and improved performance, the software has become a challenge to learn efficiently on one’s own. Users need a helping hand in order to get up to speed and make sure they are taking full advantage of this powerful software. In Capture One Pro 9: Mastering RAW Development, Image Processing, and Asset Management, photographer Sascha Erni teaches readers everything they need to know in order to quickly get up and running with Capture One Pro. He also dives deeply into its extensive feature list to allow users to fully explore the capabilities of the software. Whether you’re moving to Capture One Pro from Aperture or Lightroom, or just beginning to learn image-editing with Capture One Pro 9, this book will teach you how to get amazing results while avoiding frustration and wasted time along the way. Topics include: RAW conversion Asset management Converting to black-and-white Eliminating lens errors Tethered shooting/live view Film grain simulation Working with layers HDR imaging Much, much more     Download (76MB) Raw Workflow from Capture to Archives The Ilex Introduction to Photography Mastering Photographic Histograms How Do I Do That in Photoshop? CliffsNotes Taking and Sharing Digital Photographs Load more posts

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