Best Bike Rides Boston: Great Recreational Rides In The Metro Area by Shawn Musgrave


75595a120c7b407-261x361.jpg Author Shawn Musgrave
Isbn 9780762746941
File size 205MB
Year 2014
Pages 304
Language English
File format PDF
Category hobbies



 

Best Bike Rides Boston BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 1 2/6/14 1:47 PM Help Us Keep This Guide Up to Date Every effort has been made by the author and editors to make this guide as accurate and useful as possible. However, many things can change after a guide is published—roads are detoured, facilities come under new management, phone numbers change, and so forth. We would love to hear from you concerning your experiences with this guide and how you feel it could be improved and kept up to date. While we may not be able to respond to all comments and suggestions, we’ll take them to heart, and we’ll also make certain to share them with the author. Please send your comments and suggestions to the following address: Globe Pequot Press Reader Response/Editorial Department P.O. Box 480 Guilford, CT 06437 Or you may e-mail us at: [email protected] Thanks for your input, and happy travels! BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 2 2/6/14 1:47 PM Best Bike Rides® Series Best Bike Rides Boston Great Recreational Rides in the Metro Area shawn musgrave BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 3 2/6/14 1:47 PM FALCONGUIDES® Copyright © 2014 by Morris Book Publishing, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, except as may be expressly permitted in writing from the publisher. Requests for permission should be addressed to Globe Pequot Press, Attn: Rights and Permissions Department, P.O. Box 480, Guilford, CT 06437. FalconGuides is an imprint of Globe Pequot Press. Falcon, FalconGuides, Outfit Your Mind, and Best Bike Rides are registered trademarks of Morris Book Publishing, LLC. Maps by Trailhead Graphics, Inc. © Morris Book Publishing, LLC All photos are by the author. Text design: Sheryl Kober Layout artist: Justin Marciano Project editor: Ellen Urban Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Musgrave, Shawn. Best bike rides Boston : great recreational rides in the metro area / Shawn Musgrave. pages cm Summary: “Best Bike Rides Boston describes 40 of the greatest recreational rides in the Boston area”— Provided by publisher. ISBN 978-0-7627-4694-1 (paperback) 1. Cycling—Massachusetts—Boston Region—Guidebooks. I. Title. GV1045.5.M42M87 2014 796.6'40974461—dc23 2014004082 Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 The author and Globe Pequot Press assume no liability for accidents happening to, or injuries sustained by, readers who engage in the activities described in this book. BBR_Boston_FinalPP_CS55.indd 4 2/6/14 4:31 PM Contents Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Ride Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi The Rides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Getting to the Rides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii What to Bring with You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv Your Mileage Will Vary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv Planning for Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Ride Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi Map Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xx Boston and Cambridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1. The Freedom Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2. Charles River Esplanade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 3. Back Bay, Fenway, and Copley Square 4. The Fens to Jamaica Pond 5. Boston Harbor Loop . . . . . . . . . . .19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 6. East Boston Greenway, Belle Isle Marsh, and Deer Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 7. Southwest Corridor Park and Jamaica Plain 8. Millennium Park . . . . . . . 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 9. South End, Roxbury, and Franklin Park 10. South Bay Harbor Trail . . . . . . . . . . 64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 11. Arboretum, Roslindale, Stony Brook, and Franklin Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 12. The Seven Campus Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 13. Massachusetts Avenue to Arlington Reservoir 14. Cambridge Bow-Tie Ride . . . . . . . . 95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 15. Somerville Community Path, Alewife Linear Park, and Fresh Pond BBR_Boston_FinalPP_CS55.indd 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 2/7/14 10:35 AM BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 6 2/6/14 1:47 PM 9 90 290 117 2 495 495 Overview 40 39 126 90 17 3 Framingham 117 9 3 2 Waltham 20 8 Medford 3 95 93 95 Dedham 1 Revere Malden 22 16 93 21 138 30 95 93 95 31 24 107 Lynn Quincy 14, 15 Boston 6 Cambridge 12 1 5 36 90 2, 3 30 29 34 4, 7 Newton 10, 13 35 9 37 38 11 28 95 19 495 133 Concord 18 Lowell 32 Weymouth 23 Salem 25 3A Beverly 33 26 127 5 Massachusetts Bay 128 0 0 5 Rockport 10 mi. Gloucester 27 10 km. N North of Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 16. Somerville, Medford, and the Mystic River Reservation 17. Walden Pond . 118 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 18. Lexington, Concord, and the Minute Man National Historical Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 19. The Minuteman Commuter Bikeway . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 20. Woburn and Horn Pond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 21. Middlesex Fells Reservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 22. Northern Strand Community Trail to Lynn Woods 23. Lynn and Marblehead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 24. Revere Beach to Nahant 25. Salem . . . . . 157 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 26. Salem to Gloucester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 27. Gloucester to Rockport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 South of Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 28. South End to Blue Hills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 29. Castle Island to Nickerson Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 30. Blue Hills Reservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 31. Quincy to Nut Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 32. Braintree, Weymouth, and World’s End 33. Scituate to Hull . . . . . . . . . 222 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 West of Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236 34. Kenmore Square to Chestnut Hill Reservoir 35. Brookline Loop and JFK Birthplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 36. Auburndale Park and the Upper Charles River 37. Wellesley Hills . . . . . . . . . 237 . . . . . . . 249 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 38. Hemlock Gorge Reservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 39. Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge and Assabet River Rail-Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 40. Boston Marathon Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Ride Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Contents BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 7 vii 2/6/14 1:47 PM Acknowledgments No project of this scale is possible without the support, patience, and assistance of many people. While a full list of every person who offered assistance would eclipse the book itself in length, I would like to acknowledge a few in particular who helped make this book happen. First, I would like to thank the many bicycle clubs, civic associations, and citizen cooperatives that have made Greater Boston and eastern Massachusetts such a fantastic place to ride. Groups like MassBike, Boston Cyclists Union, LivableStreets, Cambridge Bikes, Societies of Spontaneity, Bike to the Sea, and fellow advocates across the Commonwealth routinely put in heroic effort, often at great personal cost. Cyclists in Massachusetts owe these bike warriors a deep debt for the countless hours of legislative advocacy, generous funding, and expert guidance they invest each year to keep Massachusetts at the frontier of bike friendliness. Their passion and dedication laid the foundation for every ride within these pages. While I have done my best to acknowledge particular contributions, there is scarce enough ink to number their hard-won victories. There are also many fellow cyclists and travelers who gave invaluable advice about routes, points of interest, and logistics, particularly for rides farther from Boston proper. While I caught few of their names and many exchanges were only as long as a stoplight, their knowledge and guidance helped shape this book in countless small ways. Your willingness to chat with a sweaty stranger is endearing and wonderful. This book would also not be possible at all without the dedication of the FalconGuides and Globe Pequot Press staff, who have worked tirelessly to make the book as clear and accurate as possible. I would like to thank my Mom and Dad for teaching me to ride a bike in the first place, and for always pushing me to tackle challenges. Gretchen and Jeff, our childhood adventures sparked my passion for biking, even if you both mercilessly clobbered me in every race. Thanks to Sevan, Lea, Nick, Dan, and Garrett for coming along on a few rides each, even when I was murky on where we were going, how long we’d be gone, or whether the route required mountain bikes. Teddy, your unflagging encouragement and frank support is sometimes the only thing that sustains my confidence. Ari, you propel my work ethic and creativity like no one else with your enthusiasm and perpetual “Yes And” mindset. Santi, I never could have finished this project without work naps, quesadillas, and fresh-brewed tea. viii BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 8 2/6/14 1:47 PM Introduction Known around the globe for its sports, seafood, and schools, Boston is also famous for styling itself the “Hub of the Universe,” or simply “the Hub.” (Don’t call it “Beantown.” Just don’t.) It may not be a city that never sleeps—good luck catching the subway past midnight—and it’s certainly not the most polite of towns—wear a Yankees jersey to Fenway at your peril—but Boston has it all: a fascinating history that stretches back to the country’s founding, a progressive and dynamic culture that propels it fearlessly forward, and a self-deprecating devotion that kept people flocking to Fenway through an eighty-plus-year pennant drought. Like many major metro areas across the world, Boston is a city of diverse neighborhoods, each of its districts, boroughs, and blocks boasting its own history and distinct feel. Two points straight across the Charles or Mass Ave can feel worlds or decades apart, rather than fractions of a mile. A ride on the T can carry you from harbor to downtown to wooded fields in the time it takes to scarf down a cannoli. Such variety is one of the best things a city can have, and it’s one of the reasons people love calling Boston home. And with each year, Greater Boston is becoming a better place to bike, both for transportation and for pleasure. Whether it’s commuting from Harvard Square to Dorchester, or schlepping up Comm Ave to Newton, cycling is by far the fastest way of getting around. For decades, city planners and citizen advocates have built car-free thoroughfares like the Southwest Corridor Park, Charles River Esplanade, South Bay Harbor Loop, and Minuteman Commuter Bikeway into the fabric of the metro area. And newer routes like the Somerville Community Path, East Boston Greenway, and Northern Strand Community Trail continue to expand and interlink new destinations into the regional network of paths. Biking also makes it easy to escape downtown and the city’s bustle for quieter locales, whether you want to head north to Horn Pond, south to the Blue Hills or Quincy Shore, or west to Hemlock Gorge. A half hour’s drive or commuter rail trip will take you even farther, to the picturesque Marblehead, Revere Beach, Assabet River, or World’s End. Whatever mood you’re in, particular terrain you want to tackle, or type of cyclist you happen to be, there’s a ride within easy reach for all. Happy riding! ix BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 9 2/6/14 1:47 PM About This Book This book is for people looking to explore the area in and around Boston by mountain, hybrid, or road bike. Most of the rides are between 10 and 30 miles, although there are some rides that are a little shorter or a hair longer. The rides were chosen this way to cater to people who want to do more than a couple miles but aren’t looking to pedal arduous circuits of 60 miles, and who appreciate taking in sights along a route. A number of the rides are close together, though, and those who want to put together longer rides can easily combine or modify these paired routes to create new or longer rides. All of the rides in the book are appropriate for anyone who is healthy and has done some cycling. Each ride includes a description of its length and terrain to give an overall sense for difficulty and time to complete the ride. Keep in mind that some of the shorter rides may still be challenging due to terrain or steep climbs. Before attempting the longer or more difficult rides, it is a good idea to try out some of the shorter and easier rides. The view from Fan Pier across the water to the harbor front. x BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 10 2/6/14 1:47 PM Organization Rides in this book are grouped into four geographic areas, all within an hour or so of downtown: • Boston and Cambridge—rides that remain primarily within the city limits of the Hub and the People’s Republic • North of Boston—rides that explore areas north of Boston, as close as Somerville or Arlington and as far as Gloucester and Rockport • South of Boston—rides that explore areas south of Boston, as close as Quincy and as far as Scituate • West of Boston—rides that explore areas west of Boston, as close as Newton and as far as Hopkinton This grouping lets you choose a ride by the area you want to explore, as well as by terrain: Rides within Cambridge and Boston tend to be a little more urban and crowded, and thus require urban cycling skills to navigate popular paths or riding in the street. The remaining rides explore smaller towns, rural parks, and quieter coastline, although parts of these rides may go through small city centers that may still be crowded. Ride Format All the rides in this book have the same format and information. Each ride has a number, name, and a brief summary. Following that is a section that provides more details about the ride, arranged as follows: Start: The location where the ride begins Length: The length in miles of the ride Approximate riding time: An estimate of the time it will take to complete the ride, including stops Best bike: Suggestions for the type of bike best suited to the ride’s terrain and length Terrain and trail surface: The type of terrain you will encounter on the ride (flat, hilly, etc.) as well as the trail surface (paved, gravel, etc.) Traffic and hazards: A description of the type of traffic, both car and pedestrian, that you will encounter as well as any other obstacles or potential hazards to look out for along the way Maps: DeLorme: Massachusetts Atlas & Gazetteer maps along with any other worthy maps. Things to see: A list of some of the things you will see during the ride, including cultural and historical sites, small towns, highlighted neighborhoods, and other points of interest Getting there: Directions for getting to the starting point About This Book BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 11 xi 2/6/14 1:47 PM Virtual Rides If you really want to prepare for the ride and make sure you don’t get lost, you can do a quick virtual bike ride to check out the route. Go to Google Maps (www.maps.google.com) and type in the city and state where the ride is starting. You will be presented with a map of the area. If you click on the Satellite button, you will see a satellite view of the area with the roads overlaid on the map. You can zoom in or out and move the map to view the roads of the ride. You can also use the street-view layer to get actual street-level pictures of the roads that you may be riding on. This is a great feature that makes it easy to decide whether it is a good idea to ride a bike on a certain road. The satellite and street-view images for the area in and around Boston are quite detailed and can give you a good idea of the type of roads you will be navigating. Sometimes you can even tell whether the road has a shoulder. The satellite and street-view images may be a few years old, so they don’t necessarily show the current conditions. That said, most roads don’t change that often, so the images are usually pretty accurate. The one thing that is hard to tell from the satellite view is the type of terrain and how hard a particular climb is. Google Maps is the next best thing to doing the ride itself and is an invaluable tool for planning a trip. Following these categories comes a complete description of the ride, along with details about the places and things you will see along the way. The next section, Miles and Directions, is a step-by-step description of the ride with mileage. Immediately following in Ride Information you’ll find supplemental details about local events/attractions that you might be able to incorporate into your outing and lists of public restrooms along the route. As you read through each ride, you’ll also find highlighted information on nearby bike shops, which may come in handy if you run into trouble along the way. Another resource for you is the ride map, which gives an overview of the roads along the ride and the surrounding area. The route is clearly marked on the map and includes symbols to mark the start/ end of the ride and the miles at each turn. (See the map legend for a complete list of the symbols used.) Key to icons used in this edition: Roads xii Mountain Bike Trails Paths About This Book BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 12 2/6/14 1:47 PM The Rides Getting to the Rides If you live in Greater Boston, then getting to the ride can just be a matter of riding to the starting point. If you live in the outlying suburbs or the starting point is too far to ride to, then you’ll either have to drive or take mass transit. Because of parking scarcity in the area and the fact that many cyclists don’t have cars of their own, most of the rides selected for this book can be accessed by public transit. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA, or just “the T”), Boston’s mass transit system, is bike-friendly along most lines and allows bicycles on most trains and buses except during morning and evening rush hours. Restrictions are listed below: Subway (“The T”) • Green Line: Bikes are not allowed on the Green Line at any time. • Red Line: Bikes are allowed on the Red Line except from 7 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and without restriction on weekends. • Orange Line: Bikes are allowed on the Orange Line except from 7 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and without restriction on weekends. • Blue Line: Bikes are allowed on the Blue Line except from 7 to 9 a.m. (inbound) and 4 to 6 p.m. (outbound) Monday through Friday, and without restriction on weekends. • Silver Line: Bikes cannot be carried onto the Silver Line, but can be loaded into bike racks if they are available. Bus Bikes cannot be carried onto MBTA buses, but can be loaded into bike racks if they are available. The vast majority of the MBTA bus fleet has bike racks. Commuter Rail • Bike are allowed on all commuter rail lines, as outlined in schedules, except for during peak periods. Look for the bike symbol on each line’s timetable. Note that folding bikes are allowed on all MBTA vehicles, but bikes must be folded before passing fare gates. See the MBTA website (www​.mbta​.com) for further details on bringing bikes onto public transit, as well as to enroll in the Pedal & Park program for secure bike storage at major stations. xiii BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 13 2/6/14 1:47 PM It bears repeating that driving into Boston or Cambridge can be a hassle, particularly for those unused to the particular Bostonian style of street navigation or the maze of one-way streets. Check local news and city social media for updates on traffic and construction projects along particular streets. As in most big cities, plan for extra travel time if attempting to drive during rush hour. Parking can also be a considerable challenge within Cambridge and Boston, as noted in particular rides. Street parking is limited, and free parking even rarer. If you’re commuting in, your best bet may be to park at an outlying MBTA station and take mass transit into the city to save yourself the stress of tracking down a meter. What to Bring with You Packing a few things to carry on your ride will help you take care of the most common problems. Most of these are available at any of the bike stores mentioned within the ride descriptions. • For flats: spare tube, tire levers, bike pump, and patch kit • For miscellaneous mechanical issues: multitool that fits all the screws and nuts on the bike • For fuel and hydration: water and snacks appropriate to the ride length and locale, particularly if the ride explores more rural areas • For first aid: antibacterial wipes and adhesive bandages are a godsend for chance falls • For communication and navigation: cell phone Your Mileage Will Vary Mileage for the rides are as accurate as possible, but the mileage that you will see on your bicycle computer or personal GPS will most likely be a little higher or lower. This is caused by a couple of factors. First, most bicycle computers are not as finely calibrated as a car’s odometer or most basic GPS units. To calibrate the odometer on your bicycle computer, you have to accurately measure the circumference of the front wheel to a millimeter or small fraction of an inch. If this number is off just a hair, it can significantly alter its accuracy. For example, say that your calibration of your odometer is off by just 0.5 percent. This means that each mile you ride you will be off by 0.05 mile. This may not sound like a lot, but after 10 miles your odometer will be off by 0.5 mile, by 20 miles off by a mile, and by 40 miles off by 2 miles. These small inaccuracies add up! The other main factor is that you will probably not do the ride exactly as it is mapped out in the description. You may take a wrong turn and have xiv The Rides BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 14 2/6/14 1:47 PM to backtrack, or meander around rest stops, or make any number of little changes to the route that add fractions of a mile here and there. Again, these small changes can add up. The mileage in the Miles and Directions section is best paired with the road signs and landmarks outlined in the ride description and the overview map sketched out for every ride. Trust your instincts, ask for help if you get turned around, and realize that those brief moments of being lost can often be the most fun. Planning for Safety Bike riding, particularly in a city, carries its risks. But these risks can be minimized by taking safety into your own hands: Be visible. The most important safety rule is to always be visible. Whether it’s a collision between car and bike, bike and bike, or bike and pedestrian, accidents often boil down to visibility issues. Maximize visibility by wearing bright and reflective clothing, particularly after dusk, and doing your best to stay within line of sight of all vehicles around you. Signal your intentions. Just as cars must use turn signals and have working brake lights, it’s important that cyclists indicate turns, lane changes, and stops. This means using hand signals consistently and clearly. Yelling “left turn” or “stopping” is a great additional tool to help those around you know what you’re doing. Ride predictably. When riding, especially in traffic, it is important to be predictable so other vehicles on the road know where you are going. This means following a straight line when possible, and not weaving in and out around parked cars or changing lanes rapidly. Proper signaling can prevent catastrophic miscommunication. Wear a helmet. A helmet is the most important piece of safety gear to wear while riding. It’s also a good idea to wear glasses to keep the rocks, bugs, and other debris out of your eyes, particularly for longer rides. Know and obey the law. Every state (and even particular cities) has a set of laws that apply to bicyclists. For the most part, bicyclists must follow the same laws as cars and must obey all traffic signs and signals, but brushing up on a particular area’s bike laws can prevent misunderstandings that can lead to tickets and fines and help you know your rights as a cyclist on the streets. Organizations like MassBike (www​.massbike​.org) and Boston Cyclists Union .bostoncyclistsunion​ .org) have a number of educational resources (www​ around bike laws in Massachusetts and Boston. The Rides BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 15 xv 2/6/14 1:47 PM Ride Finder Best City Rides 1 The Freedom Trail 2 Charles River Esplanade 3 Back Bay, Fenway, and Copley Square 4 The Fens to Jamaica Pond 5 Boston Harbor Loop 7 Southwest Corridor Park and Jamaica Plain 8 Millennium Park 9 South End, Roxbury, and Franklin Park 10 South Bay Harbor Trail 12 The Seven Campus Ride 13 Massachusetts Avenue to Arlington Reservoir 14 Cambridge Bow-Tie Ride 16 Somerville, Medford, and the Mystic River Reservation 25 Salem 28 South End to Blue Hills 29 Castle Island to Nickerson Beach 32 Braintree, Weymouth, and World’s End 34 Kenmore Square to Chestnut Hill Reservoir 35 Brookline Loop and JFK Birthplace 40 Boston Marathon Ride Best Rural Rides 6 11 15 17 18 19 20 22 26 27 28 30 East Boston Greenway, Belle Isle Marsh, and Deer Island Arboretum, Roslindale, Stony Brook, and Franklin Park Somerville Community Path, Alewife Linear Park, and Fresh Pond Walden Pond Lexington, Concord, and Minute Man National Park Minuteman Commuter Bikeway Woburn and Horn Pond Northern Strand Community Trail to Lynn Woods Salem to Gloucester Gloucester and Rockport South End to Blue Hills Blue Hills Reservation xvi BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 16 2/6/14 1:47 PM 33 36 37 38 39 Scituate to Hull Auburndale Park and the Upper Charles River Wellesley Hills Hemlock Gorge Reservation Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge and Assabet River Rail-Trail Best Seaside Rides 5 6 10 23 26 27 29 31 32 33 Boston Harbor Loop East Boston Greenway, Belle Isle Marsh, and Deer Island South Bay Harbor Trail Lynn and Marblehead Salem to Gloucester Gloucester and Rockport Castle Island to Nickerson Beach Quincy and Nut Island Braintree, Weymouth, and World’s End Scituate to Hull Best Mountain Bike Rides 8 11 13 16 20 21 22 30 34 36 37 39 Millennium Park Arboretum, Roslindale, Stony Brook, and Franklin Park Massachusetts Avenue to Arlington Reservoir Somerville, Medford, and the Mystic River Reservation Woburn and Horn Pond Middlesex Fells Reservation Northern Strand Community Trail to Lynn Woods Blue Hills Reservation Kenmore Square to Chestnut Hill Reservoir Auburndale Park and the Upper Charles River Wellesley Hills Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge and Assabet River Rail-Trail Best Hill Rides 9 11 12 16 17 18 South End, Roxbury, and Franklin Park Arboretum, Roslindale, Stony Brook, and Franklin Park The Seven Campus Ride Somerville, Medford, and the Mystic River Reservation Walden Pond Lexington, Concord, and Minute Man National Park Ride Finder BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 17 xvii 2/6/14 1:47 PM 21 24 26 27 29 30 32 34 35 36 37 40 Middlesex Fells Reservation Revere Beach to Nahant Salem to Gloucester Gloucester and Rockport Castle Island to Nickerson Beach Blue Hills Reservation Braintree, Weymouth, and World’s End Kenmore Square to Chestnut Hill Reservoir Brookline Loop and JFK Birthplace Auburndale Park and the Upper Charles River Wellesley Hills Boston Marathon Ride Best Rides with Kids 2 4 5 6 7 10 14 15 19 20 22 23 34 39 Charles River Esplanade The Fens to Jamaica Pond Boston Harbor Loop East Boston Greenway, Belle Isle Marsh, and Deer Island Southwest Corridor Park and Jamaica Plain South Bay Harbor Trail Cambridge Bow-Tie Ride Somerville Community Path, Alewife Linear Park, and Fresh Pond Minuteman Commuter Bikeway Woburn and Horn Pond Northern Strand Community Trail to Lynn Woods Lynn and Marblehead Kenmore Square to Chestnut Hill Reservoir Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge and Assabet River Rail-Trail Best Scenic Rides 2 4 5 6 11 15 16 17 20 21 xviii Charles River Esplanade The Fens to Jamaica Pond Boston Harbor Loop East Boston Greenway, Belle Isle Marsh, and Deer Island Arboretum, Roslindale, Stony Brook, and Franklin Park Somerville Community Path, Alewife Linear Park, and Fresh Pond Somerville, Medford, and the Mystic River Reservation Walden Pond Woburn and Horn Pond Middlesex Fells Reservation Ride Finder BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 18 2/6/14 1:47 PM 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 35 36 37 38 39 Lynn and Marblehead Revere Beach to Nahant Salem to Gloucester Gloucester and Rockport South End to Blue Hills Castle Island to Nickerson Beach Blue Hills Reservation Quincy and Nut Island Braintree, Weymouth, and World’s End Scituate to Hull Brookline Loop and JFK Birthplace Auburndale Park and the Upper Charles River Wellesley Hills Hemlock Gorge Reservation Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge and Assabet River Rail-Trail Best Rides from Public Transit 1 The Freedom Trail 2 Charles River Esplanade 3 Back Bay, Fenway, and Copley Square 4 The Fens to Jamaica Pond 5 Boston Harbor Loop 6 East Boston Greenway, Belle Isle Marsh, and Deer Island 7 Southwest Corridor Park and Jamaica Plain 8 Millennium Park 9 South End, Roxbury, and Franklin Park 10 South Bay Harbor Trail 11 Arboretum, Roslindale, Stony Brook, and Franklin Park 12 The Seven Campus Ride 13 Massachusetts Avenue to Arlington Reservoir 14 Cambridge Bow-Tie Ride 17 Walden Pond 18 Lexington, Concord, and Minute Man National Park 19 Minuteman Commuter Bikeway 20 Woburn and Horn Pond 23 Lynn and Marblehead 24 Revere Beach to Nahant 25 Salem 26 Salem to Gloucester 27 Gloucester and Rockport Ride Finder BBR_Boston_2pp_CS55.indd 19 xix 2/6/14 1:47 PM

Author Shawn Musgrave Isbn 9780762746941 File size 205MB Year 2014 Pages 304 Language English File format PDF Category Hobbies Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Best Bike Rides Boston describes 40 of the greatest recreational rides in the Boston area. Road rides, rail trails, bike paths, and single-track mountain bike rides all get included. Most rides are in the 5 to 30 mile range, allowing for great afternoon outings and family adventures.     Download (205MB) Best Bike Rides Washington, DC: Great Recreational Rides in the Metro Area Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques Essential Bicycle Maintenance & Repair The Ultimate Guide to Bicycle Maintenance 75 Classic Rides Oregon Load more posts

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