Adobe Photoshop Creative Cloud 2017 by Munishwar Gulati


9759a52d688e258-261x361.jpg Author Munishwar Gulati
Isbn 1520350376
File size 6.85MB
Year 2017
Pages 328
Language English
File format PDF
Category cinema


 

© Copyright 2016 - Silicon Media Press All rights reserved. No part of this publication, may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, or stored in a database or retrieval system without the prior permission in writing of the publisher. Every effort has been made to supply complete and accurate information. Silicon Media Press does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and assumes no responsibility for its use. The export rights of this book are vested solely with the publisher. Contents FILE FORMATS ................................................................... 1 COLOURS ........................................................................... 7 colour Model ............................................................ 7 colour Depth .......................................................... 11 STARTING ADOBE PHOTOSHOP ........................................ 13 PHOTOSHOP WINDOW ...................................................... 14 Using the Toolbox ................................................... 14 Selecting Tools ....................................................... 15 Using the Status Bar .............................................. 16 USING PALETTES .............................................................. 16 Changing the Palette Display .................................. 16 Resetting the Palettes ............................................ 17 Using the Options Bar ............................................ 18 USING CONTEXT MENU .................................................... 19 USING ADOBE ON-LINE SERVICES ................................... 20 USING PHOTOSHOP HELP ................................................ 20 USING PLUGIN MODULES ................................................ 21 SETTING PREFERENCES .................................................. 22 GRAPHICS ........................................................................ 26 Bitmap Images ....................................................... 26 Vector Graphics ..................................................... 27 IMAGE SIZE AND RESOLUTION ........................................ 27 Pixel Dimensions .................................................... 27 Resolution ............................................................. 28 File Size ................................................................. 30 CREATING NEW IMAGES .................................................. 30 OPENING IMAGES ............................................................. 31 Opening files .......................................................... 31 Opening Photo CD files ........................................... 32 Opening Raw Files ................................................. 33 Importing Adobe Illustrator, PDF, and EPS files ...... 34 VIEWING IMAGES ............................................................. 37 Changing Viewing Options ...................................... 37 Viewing images using Navigator Palette ................... 39 Magnifying and reducing the view ........................... 40 USING THE TOOL POINTERS ............................................ 41 USING RULERS, GUIDES AND GRIDS ............................... 43 Using rulers ........................................................... 43 Using Guides ......................................................... 45 Using Grids ............................................................ 45 CHANGING IMAGE SIZE AND RESOLUTION ...................... 46 Resolution File Size and Output .............................. 46 RESAMPLING .................................................................... 48 Changing pixel dimension of an image .................... 49 Changing the Print Dimension ................................ 49 CROPPING AN IMAGE ....................................................... 50 Increasing CANVAS SIZE ....................................... 52 SCANNING IMAGES ........................................................... 52 Importing Scanned Images ..................................... 53 SAVING FILES ................................................................... 53 COLOUR GAMUTS ............................................................. 58 COLOUR CHANNELS ......................................................... 59 THE INFO PALETTE ........................................................... 59 Using the Measuring Tool ....................................... 62 Displaying colour values of the Pixels ...................... 63 BIT DEPTH ........................................................................ 65 Converting between bit depths ................................ 66 IMPROVING IMAGES ......................................................... 77 Using Histogram .................................................... 77 Adjusting colours ................................................... 79 THE MARQUEE TOOLS ..................................................... 96 MAGIC WAND TOOL ........................................................ 101 ALTERING SELECTION .................................................... 105 Expanding and reducing selections ....................... 105 Adjusting Selections Numerically .......................... 106 Adjusting Selection .............................................. 108 Softening Edges of a Selection .............................. 109 Transforming Selection ......................................... 111 DRAWING SHAPES .......................................................... 114 CREATING NEW SHAPES ................................................ 115 PATHS ............................................................................. 118 CREATING NEW PATHS ................................................... 119 Creating Multiple Sub Paths ................................. 122 Using the Paths Palette ........................................ 122 FREEHAND DRAWING ..................................................... 124 Using Freeform Pen tool ....................................... 124 Using Magnetic Pen tool ....................................... 125 USING Pen Tool .................................................... 126 EDITING PATHS AND SHAPES ......................................... 129 Selecting Paths & Shapes ..................................... 129 Editing Anchor Points .......................................... 136 Filling and Stroking Paths .................................... 138 PATHS AND SELECTION BORDERS ................................. 142 Defining Paths as Selection Borders ...................... 142 Converting Selection Borders into Paths ............... 144 THE COLOUR PICKER ..................................................... 146 Specifying a Colour using numeric values ............. 148 Windows Colour Picker ......................................... 149 Using Swatches palette ........................................ 151 THE PAINTING TOOLS ..................................................... 153 Selecting Brush .................................................... 154 Selecting mode ..................................................... 159 Selecting Tools for Painting ................................... 162 Setting Brush Dynamics ....................................... 163 ERASING ........................................................................ 165 FILLING AN IMAGE ......................................................... 167 Using the Paint Bucket tool .................................. 168 Filling Patterns .................................................... 169 USING the Gradient Tools .................................... 173 USING HISTORY AIRBRUSH ............................................ 177 MOVING, COPYING AND PASTING SELECTIONS .............. Moving Within an image ....................................... Copying and Pasting ............................................. COPYING INTO AN IMAGE .................................... Copying between Applications ............................... Deleting a selection .............................................. Removing Fringe Pixels from a Selection ............... UNDOING & REDOING CHANGES ................................... Using the History palette ...................................... Creating a Snapshot ............................................. DUPLICATING IMAGES .................................................... TRANSFORMING IMAGES ............................................... Transforming objects ............................................ RETOUCHING IMAGES .................................................... 182 182 182 184 185 185 185 186 187 189 191 192 192 197 Using the Stamp Tool .......................................... 198 Using Other Tools ................................................ 201 PRINTING IN PHOTOSHOP ............................................... 203 ENTERING TEXT ............................................................. 208 Using Various Options ......................................... 209 FORMATTING ATTRIBUTES ............................................. 213 Using Character palette ........................................ 213 Using Paragraph palette ....................................... 218 EDITING TYPE LAYERS ................................................... 222 THE LAYERS PALETTE .................................................... 228 ORGANIZING LAYERS ..................................................... 230 Creating New Layers ............................................. 230 Deleting Layers .................................................... 232 Viewing Layers ..................................................... 232 The Stacking Order ............................................. 233 Renaming Layers ................................................. 234 Linking Layers ..................................................... 234 Moving, Copying and Pasting LAYERS .................. 234 Duplicating Layers ............................................... 235 Aligning Layer Contents ....................................... 236 Merging Layers ..................................................... 237 Flattening All Layers ............................................ 237 EDITING LAYERS ............................................................ 238 Specifying Blending Modes & Opacity ................... 238 Creating clipping groups ....................................... 238 Creating an Adjustment Layer .............................. 240 Creating Fill Layer ................................................ 240 ADDING LAYER STYLES .................................................. 241 Managing Layer Styles ......................................... 246 Applying Predefined Style ..................................... 248 Using Layer Mask ................................................ 249 THE CHANNEL PALETTE ................................................. 253 Viewing channels ................................................. 253 Alpha Channel ..................................................... 255 Editing Channels ................................................. 255 Duplicating Channels ........................................... 256 Deleting Channels ................................................ 257 Channel Mixer ..................................................... 257 MANAGING CHANNELS ................................................... 259 Splitting Channels into Separate Images ............... 259 Merging Channels ................................................ 259 SPOT CHANNELS ............................................................ 261 Creating Spot Channel ......................................... 262 Editing Spot Channel ........................................... 263 BLENDING CHANNELS .................................................... 265 Using the Calculations Command ......................... 266 Using the Apply Image command .......................... 267 MASKS IN PHOTOSHOP .................................................. 268 Using Quick Mask Mode ....................................... 269 USING ALPHA CHANNELS ............................................... 272 Creating Alpha Channels ...................................... 272 Applying Artistic Effects ....................................... 279 Applying Blur effects ............................................ 283 Applying Brush Effect .......................................... 285 Applying Distort effects ........................................ 287 Applying Noise effects ........................................... 290 Applying Pixelate Effect ........................................ 291 Applying Sharpen Effects ..................................... 293 Applying Sketch Effects ........................................ 293 Applying Stylez Effect ........................................... 296 Video Effects ........................................................ 300 Other Filters ........................................................ 300 SAVING FOR WEB ........................................................... 302 Slices ................................................................... 302 Saving Images ...................................................... 304 AUTOMATING TASK - APPLYING ACTION ......................... 308 The Action palette ................................................ 309 FILE FORMATS COLOURS STARTING ADOBE PHOTOSHOP PHOTOSHOP WINDOW USING PALETTES USING CONTEXT MENU USING ADOBE ON-LINE SERVICES USING PHOTOSHOP HELP USING PLUGIN MODULES SETTING PREFERENCES BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP An electronic image can take almost any form such as a photograph, drawing, painting, etc. that has either been created using a computer or digitally “imaged” and stored in one of a number of popular graphic file formats. There are many ways for you to get your photos onto the computer. You can retrieve photos from your hard disk, floppy diskette, digital camera, scanner, CDRom, or directly from the Internet. If necessary you can transfer them to digital format by scanning them. Select the photo that you want to use and follow the instructions provided with your scanner to scan them and save the photo to your hard drive or a floppy diskette. An image can be represented in many forms, such as a painting, or a picture. In the computer world, an image is a collection of dots called “pixels” arranged in a rectangular grid of rows and columns. Each pixel is a specific colour. The number of possible colours in an image can vary from two to 16.7 million. The simplest type of image has only black and white pixels and is referred to as a “monochrome” image. “True colour” images can contain any of 16.7 million colours. In between you have images of 256 colours and 65,000 colours (High colour). The more about colours has been discussed in next section of this chapter. Images are stored in a variety of file formats. Many different image file formats have been developed over the years for specific applications and hardware. These include: Windows Bitmap (BMP) The Windows Bitmap file format is the standard file format used by Microsoft Windows. Bitmap files can BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP contain either 2 (black and white), 16, 256, 65,000 or 16.7 million colours. Most Windows bitmap files are not compressed. It is possible to save 16 and 256 colour images in a compressed format but some applications (like Windows Paintbrush) are not able to read the compressed files. The default file extension for Windows Bitmap files is “.BMP”. Occasionally you may see bitmap files with the extension “.DIB”. Windows Run-Length Encoded (RLE) The RLE format is a variation of the Windows BMP f or m at t h a t o f f e r s a m o d e st d e g r e e o f i m a g e compression. It can be used to create compressed wallpaper files and it can be used to replace the opening Windows logo screen with a file of your own choosing. RLE files are always either 16 or 256 colour image files. The default file extension, for Windows RLE Bitmap files, is “.RLE”. CompuServe Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) The GIF file format was developed by CompuServe Inc. for use on their on-line service. GIF files are colourmapped files that can have anywhere from 2 to 256 colours. There are two versions named 87a and 89a of GIF standard. GIF files are always compressed and offer an efficient way to store large images. The default file extension, for CompuServe Graphics Interchange Format files, is “.GIF”. Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPG) The JPEG format uses a method of compression that reduces image file size by selectively reducing the amount of detail contained in the image and by transforming the image data into a format that is better suited for compression. Images with fewer details 3 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP compress extremely well, while pictures with a high degree of random detail do not compress as well, or suffer some degree of image degradation. At lower values you will experience better compression, but with a marked loss of image quality. JPEG images are either true colour or grayscale (256 shades of gray). The default file extension, for JPEG files, is “.JPG”. Photoshop Format Photoshop format (PSD) is the default file format and the only format, besides the Large Document Format (PSB), that supports all Photoshop features. All the Adobe products such as Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Premiere, Adobe After Effects, and Adobe GoLive are tightly integerated and can directly import PSD files while preserving many Photoshop features. You can save 16-bits-per-channel and high dynamic range (HDR) 32-bits-per-channel images as PSD files. FlashPix (FPX) A FlashPix file contains the complete image plus several smaller copies, all within the same file. This has the advantage of producing high-quality printouts using the higher resolutions, along with fast image manipulation by using the smaller resolutions for screen display. Images at each resolution are also divided into tiles, which enables the application to minimize the amount of data processed while accessing, displaying or printing a portion of the screen content. Truevision Targa (TGA) The Truevision Targa format was originally developed by Truevision Inc. for use with their line of graphic display cards. The Targa format is used by several high-end paint and CAD programs. colour resolutions 4 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP range from 256 colour, 32768 (16-bit) colour, 24-bit true colour and 32-bit true colour formats. The 32-bit Targa format contains 24 bits of colour data as well as 8 bits of transparency (overlay) data. Targa images exist in both compressed and uncompressed formats. The default file extension, for Targa files, is “.TGA”. PC Paintbrush (PCX) PCX files were originally developed for Z-Soft’s PC Paintbrush package. These files come in monochrome, 16 colour, 256 colour and true colour (24-bit) varieties. PCX files are compressed using a method that offers a modest degree of compression compared to other compression formats. The default file extension, for PC Paintbrush files, is “.PCX”. Tagged Image File Format (TIF) The TIFF format was developed by Microsoft and Aldus Corporations as a portable method of storing bitmap images. TIFF files come in monochrome, 16-colour, 256-colour, 16-colour grayscale, 256-colour grayscale and true colour (24-bit) varieties. TIFF files exist in both compressed and uncompressed formats. The compression format offers a high degree of compression. However, certain older paint programs that use an early version of the TIFF format may have difficulty reading compressed TIFF files. The default file extension, for TIFF files, is “.TIF”. Pegasus Image Corporation (PIC) Pegasus Imaging Corporation's compression provides better standard JPEG image compression. PIC is a com pressed i m age form a t that pro vide s fas ter decompression, better colour handling and colour reduction. 5 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP Desktop Colour Separations (DCS) Desktop colour Separations (DCS), developed by Quark, is a version of the standard EPS format. It lets you save color separations of CMYK images. Photoshop EPS The Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) language file format can contain both vector and bitmap graphics and is supported by virtually all graphic, illustration, and page-layout programs. EPS format supports Lab, CMYK, RGB, Indexed Color, Duotone, Grayscale, and Bitmap color modes, and does not support alpha channels. EPS does support clipping paths. To print EPS files, you must use a PostScript printer. Photoshop RAW format The Photoshop Raw format is a flexible file format for t r a ns f e r r i n g i m ag es b et w een a p p l i c a t i o ns a nd computer platforms. This format supports CMYK, RGB, and grayscale images with alpha channels, and multichannel and Lab images without alpha channels. Documents saved in the Photoshop Raw format can be of any pixel or file size, but they cannot contain layers. The Photoshop Raw format consists of a stream of bytes describing the color information in the image. Each pixel is described in binary format, with 0 representing black and 255 white (for images with 16?bit channels, the white value is 65535). Photoshop designates the number of channels needed to describe the image, plus any additional channels in the image. Radiance Format Radiance (HDR) is a 32-bits-per-channel file format used for HDR images, often used in 3D modeling. This original format was developed for the Radiance system, a professional tool for visualizing lighting in virtual 3D environments. The file format stores the quantity of 6 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP light per pixel instead of just the colors to be displayed onscreen. The levels of luminosity accommodated by the Radiance format are far higher than the 256 levels in 8-bits-per-channel image file formats. Digital Negative Format Digital Negative (DNG) is a file format that contains the raw image data from a digital camera and metadata that defines what the data means. DNG, Adobe’s publicly available, archival format for camera raw files, is designed to provide compatibility and decrease the current proliferation of camera raw file formats. EPS TIFF or EPS PICT Preview These formats, which appear as options in the Open and Open As dialog boxes, let you open files saved in file formats that create previews but are not supported by Adobe Photoshop. Filmstrip The Filmstrip format is used for RGB animation or movie files created by Adobe Premiere®. IFF The Amiga™ Interchange File Format (IFF) is used for working with Video Toaster and transferring files to and from the Commodore Amiga system. PDF Portable Document Format (PDF) is used by Adobe Acrobat, Adobe’s electronic publishing software for Windows, Mac OS, UNIX®, and DOS. PICT File The PICT format is widely used among Macintosh graphics and page-layout applications as an intermediary file format for transferring files between applications. 7 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP PIXAR The PI XAR fo rm at i s desi gned spe ci fi ca ll y fo r exchanging files with PIXAR image computers. PNG Developed as a patent-free alternative to GIF, the Portable Network Graphics (PNG) format is used for losslessly compressing and displaying images on the World Wide Web. Scitex CT The Scitex Continuous Tone (CT) format is used for high-end image processing on Scitex computers. We all see colour and see it differently. colour is subjective to the human eye. Each device that interacts with your project's file: the scanner, monitor, and printer may have a different colour space. For example, a colour that is visible to the human eye may not be reproducible by your printer. Therefore we require a precise method for defining each colour. A colour model is a system used to organize and define colours according to a set of basic properties which are reproducible. COLOUR MODEL Various colour models are used to display and print documents. The established models for describing and reproducing colour include HSB (fo r hue, saturation, brightness); RGB (for red, green, blue); CMYK (for cyan, magenta, yellow, black); and CIE L*a*b*. HSB Model Based on the human perception of colour, the HSB model describes three fundamental characteristics of colour: 8 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP l Every object reflect few colour while transmit other colours. Hue is the colour reflected from or transmitted through an object. It is measured as a location on the standard colour whee l, expressed as a degree between 0º and 360º. In common use, hue is identified by the name of the colour such as red, orange, or green. To give each colour its proper position, the 360º is subdivided into six equal sectors, alternating primaries and secondaries: this is called the “colour circle”. M V O Y C G Fig 1.1 colour Circle :The hues represented are magenta, orange, yellow, green, cyan & violet l l Saturation, also called chroma, is the purity of the colour. It is used to describe the state of absolute purity of a colour. The saturation is the measure of the true and proper content of a colour in a given instance. When we see one red that is redder than another (which thus appears more gray), we experience a particular sensory quality that is manifested in greater or lesser purity, rendering colours more or less rich and full. Saturation represents the amount of gray in proportion to the hue, measured as a percentage from 0% (gray) to 100% (fully saturated). On the standard colour wheel, saturation increases from the center to the edge. Brightness is the relative lightness or darkness of the colour. It is usually measured as a percentage from 0% (black) to 100% (white). 9 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP Fig 1.2 A. Saturation B. Hue C. Brightness D. All hues RGB Model The millions of colours you see on your monitor can all be described as mixture of red, green, and blue in various proportions and intensities. These three colour components form the basis for the RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) colour model. Where the colours overlap, they create cyan, magenta, and yellow. Each of the three colours is assigned a numeric value between 0 and 255. The RGB model is based on colours of light, and higher RGB values correspond to the presence of greater quantities of white light. Consequently, higher RGB values result in lighter colours. When all three colour components are at the maximum value, the resulting colour is white light. Fig 1.3 Additive colours (RGB) Because the RGB model creates colours by adding light, it is called an additive colour model. Video, monitors and scanners employ the additive colour model because they emit light. They emit particles of 10 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP red, green, and blue light and create the illusion of millions of different colours. CMYK Model The most common method of reproducing colour images on paper is by combining cyan, magenta, yellow, and black pigments. These four colours are the colour components of the CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and black) colour model. Each colour of the CMYK colour model is described as a percentage (from 0 to 100). Because the CMYK colour model is based on pigment colours, higher percentages of pigment result in darker colours. Fig 1.4 Subtractive colours (CMYK) Theoretically, pure cyan (C), magenta (M), and yellow (Y) pigments, when combined, absorb all colour and produce black. But all printing inks contain some impurities, therefore these three inks actually produce a muddy brown and must be combined with black (K) ink to produce a true black. The CMYK colour model is called a subtractive colour model because it creates colours by absorbing light. Combining these inks to reproduce colour is called four-colour process printing. All the offset process of printing uses the four colour printing. 11 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP L*a*b Model In 1931 La Commission International de L'Eclairage (CIE) defined a device-independent colour model, based on how the human eye perceives colour. The CIE Lab model incorporates the theory that a colour cannot be both green and red at the same time nor can it be yellow and blue at the same time. As such, single values are used to describe the green/red and blue/ yellow components of any colour. In 1976, this model was refined and named CIE L*a*b. Fig 1.5 A. Luminance =100 (white) B. Green to red component C. Blue to yellow component D. Luminance = 0 (black) to red component Lab stands for the three values this model uses to define colour lightness value (L) which can range from 0 to 100 and two chromaticity ranges: green to red (a) and blue to yellow (b). The two chromaticity values can range from +120 to -120. COLOUR DEPTH “colour Depth”, also called bit depth or pixel depth, is a term that is used to specify the maximum number of colours available or number of colours that a file can support. The simplest could be a 1-bit file supporting two colours (usually black and white). Since each pixel can have only two different states, only one “bit” of information is required to store each image. 12 BASICS OF PHOTOSHOP Similarly a 2-bit file supports four colours (two bit can store four colour, 2 to the power of 2), a 4-bit file supports 16 colours, an 8-bit file supports 256 colours, and a 24-bit file supports 16 million colours. A grayscale image is an 8-bit file, with 256 increments, ranging from black to white. The higher the colour depth supported by a file, the more space the file takes up on disk. The actual number of colours you will see on your monitor depends on the type of video hardware and video drivers you are using. Monochrome One-bit data type. Each pixel can be either black or white. Grayscale Grayscale images can contain black, white and a range of grays. 16-colour (4 bits per pixel) grayscale images contain 16 shades of gray ranging from pure white to pure black. 256-colour (8 bits per pixel) grayscale images contain 256 shades of gray ranging evenly from pure white to pure black. Indexed 16 and 256-Colour Indexed, or colour-mapped, images contain colours specified by a table of colour values. The colour values may be chosen from a larger range of available colours, but only the colours actually in the table are displayed in the image. For example, your system may be able to display 256 colours simultaneously, but if you load a 16-colour image, you can only draw in the image using the 16 colours contained in the colour table for that image. Indexed 16-colour images use 4 bits per pixel to represent the image while indexed 256-colour images use 8 bits per pixel. 13

Author Munishwar Gulati Isbn 1520350376 File size 6.85MB Year 2017 Pages 328 Language English File format PDF Category Cinema Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Adobe PhotoShop Creative Cloud 2017 – The easy way to colour painting, photo retouching and image editing, even if you have never designed before. This book provides step-by-step information on how to use all the tools of Photoshop. The concept has been explained in plain simple English, thus ensuring you understand. The book is a must-read for Web-designers, Artists, Publishers, and anyone who is interested in getting most out of this innovative art production tool. How the book is organised Chapter 1 introduces you to Adobe PhotoShop Creative Cloud 2017 and discuss about various menus and using PhotoShop help. Chapter 2 tells you the various concepts required to work with images. It tells you about resolution, resampling, cropping and scanning of images besides other concepts. Chapter 3 explains you the concept of colours gamuts, channels and palettes provided in Photoshop. As you move on to Chapter 4, you are introduced to various tools required for selecting the image. Chapter 5 covers all about freehand drawing and paths and shapes and using them for various purpose. Chapter 6 tells you about various tools required for Painting and Erasing in Photoshop. Chapter 7 tells you about tools required for editing and retouching the image. Chapter 8 tells you to write text in Photoshop images. Chapter 9 tells you all about working with Layers, editing Layers and adding effects to the layers. Chapter 10 tells you about working with Channels and Masks. Chapter 11 discusses various filters that can be applied to the images. Chapter 12 tells you all about optimizing and automating the task in Photoshop. This book is a sincere effort for explaining the concepts of Adove Photoshop. We sincerely hope that you find this work to be informative and enjoyable. As a reader, you are the most important critic and commentator of our books. We value your opinion and want to know what we are doing right, what we could do better, what areas you would like to see us publish in, and any other words of wisdom you are willing to pass.     Download (6.85MB) How Do I Do That in Photoshop? Photoshop For Beginners 11th Edition Good and Geeky iPad Artist: Digital Art Techniques Adobe Photoshop CS6 Bible Photo Editing by Margaret Brown (2016) Load more posts

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