3Ds Max Modeling: Bots, Mechs, And Droids by Jon Weimer


3ds-Max-Modeling-Bots-Mechs-and-Droids-238x360.jpg Author Jon Weimer
Isbn 9781598220445
File size 52 Mb
Year 2008
Pages 809
Language PDF
File format English
Category drawing



 

â 3ds Max Modeling: Bots, Mechs, and Droids Jon Weimer This page intentionally left blank. 3ds Max Modeling: Bots, Mechs, and Droids â Jon Weimer Wordware Publishing, Inc. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Weimer, Jon 3ds Max modeling : bots, mechs, and droids / by Jon Weimer. p. cm. Includes index. ISBN 10: 1-59822-044-6 ISBN 13: 978-1-59822-044-5 (pbk., companion DVD) 1. Computer animation. 2. Computer graphics. 3. 3ds max (Computer file). I. Title. TR897.7.W4485 2008 006.6'96--dc22 2008002682 © 2008, Wordware Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved 1100 Summit Avenue, Suite 102 Plano, Texas 75074 No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means without permission in writing from Wordware Publishing, Inc. Printed in the United States of America ISBN 10: 1-59822-044-6 ISBN 13: 978-1-59822-044-5 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0803 Autodesk and 3ds Max are registered trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and/or other countries. Other brand names and product names mentioned in this book are trademarks or service marks of their respective companies. Any omission or misuse (of any kind) of service marks or trademarks should not be regarded as intent to infringe on the property of others. The publisher recognizes and respects all marks used by companies, manufacturers, and developers as a means to distinguish their products. This book is sold as is, without warranty of any kind, either express or implied, respecting the contents of this book and any disks or programs that may accompany it, including but not limited to implied warranties for the book’s quality, performance, merchantability, or fitness for any particular purpose. Neither Wordware Publishing, Inc. nor its dealers or distributors shall be liable to the purchaser or any other person or entity with respect to any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to have been caused directly or indirectly by this book. All inquiries for volume purchases of this book should be addressed to Wordware Publishing, Inc., at the above address. Telephone inquiries may be made by calling: (972) 423-0090 Contents Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii What’s Different in 3ds Max 2008? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Introduction to Max . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Primitives and Extended Primitives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Standard Primitives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Editable Polygons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Day 1: Building a Simple Bot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Day 2: Finishing the Bot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Chapter 1 Spider Bot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Day 1: Building the Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Day 2: Building the Legs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Day 3: Detailing the Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Day 4: Wiring the Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Day 5: Refining the Middle Leg and Adding the Hydraulic Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Day 6: Creating the Claw and Connecting the Hydraulics to the Legs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Day 7: Creating the Remaining Legs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Why Doesn’t My Model Look Real? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Chapter 2 Hunter-Killer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Day 1: Building the Eye-Pod . . . . . . . . . . . . Day 2: Building the Engine Nacelles I . . . . . . . Day 3: Building the Engine Nacelles II. . . . . . . Day 4: Building the Engine Nacelles III — Pipes . Day 5: Detailing the Nacelle . . . . . . . . . . . . Day 6: Building the Rotors . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day 7: Building the Wing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day 8: Detailing the Wing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day 9: Making the Auto-Cannon Turret Assembly Day 10: Building the Auto-Cannon . . . . . . . . . Day 11: Detailing the Auto-Cannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 215 233 254 282 290 315 335 348 370 395 v Day 12: Making the Missile Pods . . . . Day 13: Building the Body . . . . . . . Day 14: Building the Boom Assemblies Day 15: Building the Hydraulics . . . . Day 16: Final Detailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 434 446 472 519 Chapter 3 The Battle Mech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 Day 1: Building the Toe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day 2: Building the Toe Hydraulics . . . . . . . . Day 3: Completing the Toe Armor and Hydraulics Day 4: Completing the Foot . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day 5: Assembling the Foot Controllers . . . . . . Day 6: Assembling the Middle Leg . . . . . . . . . Day 7: Assembling the Upper Leg . . . . . . . . . Day 8: Creating the Second Leg, Hips, and Base . Day 9: Detailing the Rear Base and Adding the Turret and Upper Body . . . . . . . . . . . Day 10: Detailing the Upper Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 536 564 594 614 631 648 683 716 . . . . . . . . 748 . . . . . . . . 780 Chapter 4 Maxi the Android . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801 Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 807 vi Preface Who Should Buy This Book? Have you wanted to learn how to create 3D models, but were concerned that you lacked the artistic skills or were daunted by looking at a computer interface with hundreds of controls? Perhaps you wanted to learn to model, but were put off by having to wade through a 500-page discussion of the UI before getting down to business. If so, this is the book for you. From the very first page (well, the first page of the Introduction, anyway), you’ll start modeling something you can show your friends. We’ll pick up anything you need to know about the UI when you need to know it. This book will get you up to speed modeling faster than you ever thought possible! And without having to spend years studying artistic techniques. Okay, I can see you don’t believe me. I have absolutely no artistic skills. None. Fortunately, you don’t need them to model in 3D. That’s right, I said it out loud! I told you 3D’s dirty little secret. All those things you need to know to draw a lifelike image of your Aunt Sally — perspective, balance, shading, etc. — are done for you by the program. You don’t even need to be able to draw a straight line. Modeling in 3D is more like building something with LEGO bricks than painting, sketching, or modeling with clay. You start with building blocks, called primitives, which are a lot like LEGO pieces, and combine them to make your model. If you can build something with LEGOs, you can model in 3D. It really is that simple. vii What Can You Expect? As I said, this is a book designed to take you from not knowing anything about modeling to building a sophisticated model in a short amount of time. This book will not teach you to design the coolest robots ever. If that’s what you’re looking for, might I suggest two excellent Gnomon Workshop DVDs by LucasFilm’s Feng Zhu: http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/fzh01.html http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/fzh02.html If you’re interested in learning more about lighting in Max, I’d suggest Wordware’s 3ds Max Lighting by Nicholas Boughen (1-55622-401-X). Who Should Not Buy This Book? If you’re the type of person who buys 3ds Max for Dummies, and then complains on Amazon.com that it didn’t have enough advanced modeling techniques, this is not the book for you. This book is designed for beginners. Does that mean there’s nothing in here for intermediate modelers? No. I try to touch on as many tools as I can. So while you may be an intermediate modeler, you may never have had the need to use a Hose primitive or Soft Selection and you can learn to do that here. If you are interested in more advanced techniques, here is a list of excellent resources you may find valuable: Books: 3ds max Lighting by Nicholas Boughen, Wordware Publishing (1-55622-401-X) Modeling a Character in 3ds max: Second Edition by Paul Steed, Wordware Publishing (1-55622-088-X). Essential CG Lighting Techniques with 3ds Max by Darren Brooker, Focal Press (978-024052022) Rendering with mental ray & 3ds Max by Joep van der Steen, Focal Press (978-0240808932) DVD Training: Global Illumination: Exteriors by Chris Nichols (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/cni01.html) Global Illumination: Interiors by Chris Nichols (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/cni02.html) viii Environment Creation for Production by Tim Jones (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/tjo01.html) Environment Lighting for Production by Tim Jones (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/tjo02.html) Character Modeling for Production by Ian Joyner (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/ijo01.html) Character Texturing for Production by Ian Joyner (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/ijo02.html) Creature Modeling for Production by Laurent Pierlot (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/lpi01.html) Creature Detailing for Production by Laurent Pierlot (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/lpi02.html) Creature Texturing and Rendering for Production by Laurent Pierlot (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/lpi03.html) Matte Painting Production Techniques by Chris Stoski (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/cst01.html) 3D Matte Painting and Camera Mapping by Chris Stoski (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/cst02.html) Set Extension and Lighting Effects by Chris Stoski (www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/cst03.html) Using This Book From the very first page, you’ll hit the ground running by building your first model. We are not going to spend a lot of time explaining what every button and drop-down list does. As we go along, I will explain how to use each of the relevant controls. I’ll also provide you with the exact values that I’m using so you will get results similar, if not exactly the same, to mine. While this book may seem dauntingly long, it’s because I’m taking pains not to skip any steps. When I was learning 3D, I became very frustrated by books and videos that either skipped steps or made model modifications between lessons. This does not happen here at the risk of going a bit long. To help with the length, I’ve broken the modeling down by days. You are not limited to this. If you want to sit down and do an entire model in one sitting, by all means go ahead. ix I’ve also provided some unique tips and notes boxes to help you learn. Don’t Forget: The Don’t Forget box reminds you of things you need to remember to do. Fire Drill: Fire Drills guide you to avoid making common mistakes. FYI: FYI boxes give you essential background information in as concise a way as possible. In many instances, FYI boxes explain why we’re doing certain things when it’s not obvious. Message: Message boxes, though rare, provide you additional resources and information you might find valuable or to help you to improve your skills. Urgent: Urgent boxes apprise you of important steps that you should not skip! Otherwise, you may make a serious mistake or damage your model. What’s on the DVD? And finally, the companion DVD contains includes all the images in the book in full color, a PDF version of a chapter on creating an android, and video tutorials totaling 10 hours. The files are organized in the following folders: n Chapter 4 — A PDF of Chapter 4, “Maxi the Android,” and reference images used to create the android n Images — Full-color versions of all the images in the book, compressed and organized by chapter n Materials — Three videos showing how to create and work with materials, along with support files n MATRIX — A tutorial from 3-d Palace demonstrating the modeling and animation of the devastating sentinel bots from the film The Matrix n max script — A MAXScript file used in Chapter 3 to paint rivets on armor The author may be contacted at [email protected] x What’s Different in 3ds Max 2008? If I were buying this book, the first thing I would want to know, after how much it costs, is whether or not it is up-to-date with the latest version. The answer is yes. You can use this book to learn modeling using 3ds Max 6 through 2008. What follows is a description of what is new in modeling* in 3ds Max 2008 and how that affects this book. Fortunately, there were only minor changes in the modeling tools between versions 8 and 2008. Preview of SubObject Selection This new feature is a switch contained in a new rollout in the Selection panel. This allows you to preview a selection at the subobject level. When SubObject is turned on, the preview selection highlights whatever subobject the cursor is over. This makes 3ds Max selection work like Cinema 4D’s. Also, like Cinema 4D’s Live Selection, you can “paint” a selection while holding down the Control key. While this is a huge benefit over previous versions of Max, it is just a selection aid and will not change any of the techniques shown in this book. Figure N-1 * This material is taken from the New Features section of 3ds Max 2008’s Reference. xi Press/Release Shortcut This allows you to “hot swap” between two editing functions. For example, suppose you are using the Bevel tool. To switch to Extrude, you would press the Shift+E keyboard shortcut. You will be able to extrude as long as you press and hold Shift+E. Once you release the keys, you return to the Bevel tool. While some may find this a timesaver, and while it can be used with the techniques shown in this book, it will not be used in the text. Chamfer Edge Segments Chamfering is a term from woodworking that refers to beveling an edge. Specifically, if two surfaces are at right angles, chamfering will flatten the edge to 45 degrees. In contrast, filleting rounds corners. Figure N-2 When you used the Chamfer tool in previous versions of Max, you could only adjust the Chamfer Amount setting, which affected the severity of the chamfering angle. If you wanted to round an edge (fillet), you had to perform successive chamfers. In 2008, the Chamfer tool now has a Segments setting. Change the Segments setting to 2 or more to create a fillet; the more segments you add, the smoother the rounding. xii Since we do a fair amount of chamfering in this book, this will be the most significant difference. The way this impacts you, the reader, is when we get to a section in which we’re rounding edges using a series of chamfers, you can use this approach instead. However, adding segments using Chamfer Edges creates segments that are equally spaced. Often, when we do a successive chamfer in the book, we’ll be using differing chamfer amounts each time, so if you want your model to look exactly like the examples, you won’t be able to make use of this Segments setting anyway, since my model will not have equally spaced segments. SubObject Normal Constraint SubObject Normal Constraint has been added to the Edit Geometry rollout. This is similar to Edge Constraint. Edge Constraint limits a subobject’s (e.g., vertex, polygon, edge) transformations (e.g., move, scale, rotate) to the boundaries of a particular edge. SubObject Normal limits each subobject’s transformations to its normal, or the average of its normals. In most cases, this causes subobjects to move perpendicular to the surface. I do not use Edge Constraint or Face Constraint in this book, so this change is not relevant. Working Pivot Use Working Pivot allows you to use a working pivot to make quick transforms without having to change the main pivot. Although this is a very useful addition to Max and greatly accelerates the workflow for advanced users, it does not significantly impact the content of this book. xiii This page intentionally left blank. Acknowledgments No book of any size is the creation of just one person, just as it takes hundreds of dedicated people to build a car or an airplane. I would like to thank the following people for their contributions, whether direct or indirect, in the completion of this book. n Thanks to Cris Robson of 3D Palace and Jon Bell for teaching me everything I know about 3ds Max modeling. n Thanks to the best publishing team an author could ask for: Beth Kohler, Alan McCuller, Martha McCuller, and Tim McEvoy. n Thanks to my wife, Anna, for her love and support. Last, but definitely not least, thanks to Steve McPherson, my partner in crime and the best illustrator and LightWave artist I know. xv This is the bot we create in this chapter, complete with texture and lighting. Introduction to Max Welcome to the wonderful world of modeling in Max. This book teaches you modeling; we won’t be touching on animation, materials, or lighting. If you want a more well-rounded treatment, I suggest you pick up a copy of Essential 3ds Max 2008 by Sean McBride (ISBN 1-59822-050-0), available from Wordware. In this book, I’m going to teach you to model the best way you can: by modeling. We’re not going to spend any time explaining the intimate details of the user interface; we’ll learn what we need when we need it. One of the biggest challenges when learning a 3D package is to not be overwhelmed by the huge number of functions and features. That said, there are just a few things that you will need to know to start working. That’s what this chapter is for. If you already know the basics, like what a primitive is and how to navigate the user interface, you’re welcome to skip ahead to Chapter 1. However, we will be building a cool bot in this chapter and you might miss something special. You never know. When you’re done with this chapter, you’ll know every tool you need to model anything. All those other tools and widgets, once you learn them, are time-savers and icing on the cake. FYI: The product we now know as 3ds Max by Autodesk, Inc. has gone through a number of release versions and name changes over the years, and has also been titled 3D Studio MAX and 3ds max. The current release is 3ds Max 2008. 1 2 | Introduction to Max Primitives and Extended Primitives Primitives and Extended Primitives Open 3ds Max. If you’re using the default UI setup, your screen should look like this: Figure I-1: Default UI layout FYI: Depending on your screen resolution settings, the toolbars and other UI controls may be located slightly differently. Don’t worry if you have additional toolbars showing. The only features you need for the exercises in this chapter are the main toolbar and the command panel (as shown in Figure I-1). If your UI does not show the command panel or the main toolbar, not to worry. Pull down the Customize menu, select Show UI, and then check both Show Command Panel and Show Main Toolbar, as shown in Figure I-2. Figure I-2: Configuring your UI layout Introduction to Max | 3 Click on the Perspective viewport and hit the Maximize Viewport toggle button, which is the bottommost icon on the right side of your screen. Alternatively, you can press Alt+W to toggle between maximizing your view and displaying the four orthogonal views. Figure I-3: Maximize Viewport toggle Standard Primitives Look on the right side of the screen. This is the command panel. We’ll be spending a lot of time here. The command panel is composed of subpanels, which are accessible by clicking the tabs at the top of the panel. The default tab (a white arrow pointing to a white asterisk) is the one at the upper left. This is the Create panel, and this is where all projects start. At the top of the Create panel is a drop-down list that displays the words Standard Primitives. PrimiFigure I-4: The tives are basic 3D computer graphics (CG) forms. CG modeling in 3D is more akin to sculpture than drawing Create panel or sketching. Just as a sculptor starts with a block of stone or clay and sculpts a form from it, 3D modeling starts with a primitive and the modeler sculpts an object from it using a variety of tools. Max provides you with a list of 10 standard primitives, which are listed in the rollout labeled Object Type. Ninety-nine percent of the time, you will only use four of these primitives: box, sphere, cylinder, and torus. Left-click* on the Box button. Click and hold the left mouse button while dragging anywhere in the Perspective view. When you have a * From here on out, I will use the term “click” to mean clicking the left mouse button. When I want you to use the right or middle mouse buttons, I will specifically say so. Introduction to Max Primitives and Extended Primitives

Author Jon Weimer Isbn 9781598220445 File size 52 Mb Year 2008 Pages 809 Language PDF File format English Category Drawing Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare 3ds Max Modeling: Bots, Mechs, and Droids offers an unparalleled, project-based learning strategy for anyone who is interested in modeling with 3ds Max. From the very first pages, readers will discover how to use the Max toolset to create sophisticated models, including a spider bot, hunter-killer, battle mech, and android. Learn how to use the 3ds Max toolset without relying on third-party models. Watch the progression of the models through hundreds of screen captures, also available in full color on the companion DVD. Take advantage of the book’s learn-as-you-go approach to creating a variety of intricate robotic models with 3ds Max. Companion DVD includes full color, expanded chapter demonstrating how to model an android, ten hours of video tutorials including a 17-part tutorial from 3-d Palace on modeling a sentinel bot from the movie The Matrix, and full-color versions of the images in the book.     Download (52 Mb) The Art Of Drawing Fantasy Characters How To Draw: Drawing And Sketching Objects And Environments From Your Imagination 50 Robots to Draw and Paint NX 9.0 for Designers You Can Draw Star Wars Load more posts

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