3d Printing – Top 5 Methods + Secrets From The Trade by Ben Franta


0356a43b23d1cef.jpg Author Ben Franta
Isbn
File size 1.3 MB
Year 2015
Pages 52
Language English
File format PDF
Category design


 

3D PRINTING Top 5 Methods + Secrets From The Trade By 3D Printing Technician: Ben Franta Copyright © 2015 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Disclaimer All the material contained in this book is provided for educational and informational purposes only. No responsibility can be taken for any results or outcomes resulting from the use of this material. While every attempt has been made to provide information that is both accurate and effective, the author does not assume any responsibility for the accuracy or use/misuse of this information. About the Author Hello and thank you for choosing my quick learning guide! My name is Ben Franta and I was born in America during the year 1987 (surprisingly around the time 3D printing was invented!). I have 2 college degrees, an Associate in Computer Design and Animation Engineering and a Bachelors of Science degree in Technology. I have been very fortunate to land my first career in the field of Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing). I work with a variety of 3D printers every day and also have close relationships with companies who also use additive manufacturing processes. I also continuously research 3D printing technology every day to see what new innovations are surfacing in the world. This technology is very fascinating to me and I really enjoy teaching it to people who are unaware of it or who want to learn more about it. Enjoy! Preface This guide is intended to give you a quick understanding of how 3D printing works and what specific processes are being used today. Below is a list of what you will learn: Brief Summary of 3D Printing Current Printing Processes Quick Learning Summary of Each Printing Process Deeper Understanding of Each Printing Process What The Strengths and Weaknesses Are of Each Process Secret Tips For Desktop Printing Applications What The Future May Hold Table of Contents Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 Section 1: Most Common Uses for 3D Printing………………………………………….. 3 Section 2: How Does It Work? …………………………………………………………………….. 4 Section 3: Most Common Methods Used Today……………………………………… 5 Method 1: FDM………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8 Method 2: SLA……………………………………………………………………………………………… 11 Method 3: Polyjet Multijet……………………………………………………………………….. 14 or Method 4: SLS……………………………………………………………………………………………… 17 Method 5: DMLS………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 What The Future Hold……………………………………………………………………….. 21 Quick Tips May For Enthusiasts………………………………………………………………………… 23 The Future Is Now! ………………………………………………………………………………………. 25 Introduction Common Questions: How Long Has 3D Printing Been Around? Answer: Since the mid 1980’s. Chuck Hull (Co-Founder of 3DSystems) invented the SLA printing process. Stereolithography or SLA is a very common 3D printing process used today. Details to follow. Who Has Been Using It All This Time? Answer: Mostly larger scale companies who are involved with new product development. More recently the technology has expanded to smaller businesses and everyday hobbyists. Why 3D Printing? Answer: 3D Printers can create hundreds of different parts in a single build within a day or two. This saves companies time and money when developing new products. Why? Although not as durable, it is extremely faster and more cost effective than traditional manufacturing methods such as CNC machining. Computer Numerical Controlled machines that cut away material from raw stock (mostly metal or plastic blocks or tubes). This method requires a very skilled programmer to setup and build parts which takes a lot of time (up to over a month) and effort. But please understand that CNC machining/traditional manufacturing methods will not be replaced by 3D printing anytime soon. However, traditional manufacturing methods must adapt and work with 3D printers (which is already happening). Today, 3D Printed parts are nice for quick fit testing (during new product development) but they would never last as long as a machined or molded part. So I Can Create Anything If I Bought a Desktop 3D Printer? Answer: No! Please do not buy into this hype that the media and start-up companies have been spewing out over the past few years. Don’t get me wrong, you can create some very meaningful and helpful things with them (i.e. prosthetic arms/hands to simple fixtures to help around the house) but do not expect to design and print something and it to be functional or even comparable to an on-the-shelf product for long. Most desktop printers today are very unreliable and take a lot of patience (tinkering with the printer and refining design so the object is printable). So please be a bit sceptical when you read headlines that read “3D printing is revolutionizing the way parts are created/manufactured!” This may ring true sometime in the future, pending a great breakthrough, but just not right now. Section 1: Most Common Uses for 3D Printing Rapid Prototypes for New Product Development (consumer products) Quick Fixtures for Lab Testing and Machining Operations Health Industry for New Implants or Pre-Op Practices/Learning’s Dental Industry for Repairs or New Tooth Implants Jewelry Industry for Custom Applications Architects for Quick Builds of Smaller Scale Model Homes or Buildings Hobbyists Section 2: How Does It Work? Quick Summary: 3D Printing, also called Additive Manufacturing, is a process where a 3D physical part is created by printing or adding very thin layers (as thin as the hair on your arm) of material on top of each other until the part is complete. Each part comes from a computer aided drawing program. The part is sent to the 3D printer where it will process or slice the 3D computer generated part into hundreds or even thousands of slices. As the printer lays down material, it will only see one slice or cross-section at a time during the printing process. When the first layer is done printing, the printers head or print bed will move up or down allowing room for the next layer to be printed. Each layer is cured to the previous layer until the part is complete. *Helpful Note: If you are more of a visual learner, like me, there are numerous videos on the internet that will help you visualize each method. I recommend Solid Concepts® videos. Section 3: Most Common Methods Used Today From my personal experience, I would have to conclude that there are only around 3 to 4 printing methods out today. Although you will learn about several process in this book, you will soon understand that they all seem to use the same methods but just slightly different than its predecessor. The processes that I feel are the most important to learn and understand are as follows – get ready for an acronym blast! FDM – Fused Deposition Modeling (MakerBot® uses this technology). For now you can think of this process as if it were like a computer controlled glue gun that deposits plastic on the build platform. More details to follow later in this guide. Polyjet/Multijet – This is where photopolymer resin is deposited by hundreds of print nozzles. A UV light cures the fresh layers of photopolymer with each deposit/pass. This process is similar to your inkjet printer at home except it uses actual plastic polymer instead of ink. SLA – Stereolithography – This is where a vat of liquid photopolymer is cured by a computer controlled UV light beam. The light beam traces each layer/cross-section of the part curing it to the previous layer. SLS – Selective Laser Sintering – This uses a similar process as SLA but instead of liquid photopolymer it uses powdered material, usually metal or plastic. The laser beam traces each cross-section “sintering” the powdered material together. This means the powdered material is heated up just enough to bond but not melt to each other – as melting would cause the part to deform. Each newly sintered cross-section bonds with the previous layer. DMLS – Direct Metal Laser Sintering – Similar to SLS, this is where a thin layer of metal powder is spread across the build platform. A computer controlled laser, typically fiber optic, will then trace the first layer of the part sintering the powder particles together. Sintering means that the laser heats up the metal powder particles just enough to make them bond to each other but they do not completely melt together. Okay, are you starting to see a trend yet? The rest of this guide will go over almost every relevant printing method out in the market today. I will have a brief “quick learning” section before each detailed description. This will give you a quick basic overview of the technology in case you don’t have time or interest to read all the fine print. Let us dive into even more detail!

Author Ben Franta Isbn File size 1.3 MB Year 2015 Pages 52 Language English File format PDF Category Design Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Hello 3D printing enthusiasts! I created this book to cut through the 3D printing “noise/hype” and deliver you a quick “go-to, no BS” reference guide to help you learn what relevant printing technologies are currently out in the industry. Wether you are curious about this technology, a hobbyist, a startup or growing company you must check out this book to see which 3D printing technology fits your needs. Below is a list of what you will learn: • Brief Summary of 3D Printing • Current Relevant Printing Processes • Quick Learning Summary of Each Printing Process • Deeper Understanding of Each Printing Process • What The Strengths and Weaknesses Are of Each Process • Secret Tips For Desktop Printing Applications • Future Insights     Download (1.3 MB) SketchUp For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech)) Digital Textile Printing AutoCAD 2002: No Experience Required Drawing for Beginners.: From Novice to Pro. Learn the basics of sketching in no time! 99 3ds Max Quick Visual Tips Load more posts

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