101 Mindful Arts-Based Activities to Get Children and Adolescents Talking by Dawn D’Amico


565962f05c67d56-261x361.jpg Author Dawn D’Amico
Isbn 9781785927317
File size 3MB
Year 2016
Pages 224
Language English
File format PDF
Category family and friendship


 

“For helping professionals working with severely traumatized children and adolescents—those who may be victims of physical abuse, sexual abuse, removal from the home or sex trafficking—Dawn D’Amico, LCSW, PhD, offers clinicallyvalidated, clinically-sophisticated exercises (including case examples and implementation instructions) designed to establish rapport, safety and support. The highly ingenious and practical exercises are organized to promote therapeutic growth in three important areas of self-expression, coping and positive thinking, and offer state-of-the-art strategies certain to enable growth, development and a sense of being understood among traumatized clients.” —Jeanne C. Marsh, PhD, MSW, George Herbert Jones Distinguished Service Professor, University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration “A must-have for clinicians working with children. Dr. D’Amico has put together a fabulous collection of simple, effective activities with examples. The book is easy to read and should be easy to use! I anticipate using these techniques in practice and sharing the book with fellow practitioners. I am enthusiastic about art and the potential for healing!” —Julia Ostendorf, MD, FAAP, 25 years in general pediatrics practice, clinical instructor PA program “As an attorney who regularly works with children in the capacity of a Guardian ad Litem in both juvenile and family law matters, I found this book exceptionally helpful. Oftentimes, and as Dr. D’Amico points out, children who have been through traumatic life experiences are hesitant to open up and discuss these events—especially with a stranger. These exercises are great ‘ice breakers’ to use in an effort to avoid further traumatizing these children, and instead giving them a safe environment to express their feelings and begin the healing process. I highly recommend this book and plan to use many of these exercises in the near future.” —Breanne M. Bucher, Attorney at Law, Walden & Schuster, S.C., Juvenile Law Section Chair – Waukesha County Bar Association “Trauma experienced in childhood or adolescence is a major contributor to the development of a substance use disorder, one of the leading public health problems of today. Through this book, Dr. D’Amico has gifted the world with a treasure trove of developmentally-sensitive, easy-to-use tools for working with severely traumatized children and adolescents to support their healing. Drawing on her decades of clinical experience as well as practical ingenuity, Dr. D’Amico has created a valuable toolbox for youth-serving professionals full of activities that are likely to be enjoyable for both youth and professional, and that can be implemented using common supplies or recycled objects.” —Sion Kim Harris, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research, Boston Children’s Hospital, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School “Therapists and other healing professionals will find this book to be an invaluable resource for engaging children and adolescents in a hands-on and creative way to nurture a strong therapeutic alliance, enhance emotional processing, and achieve meaningful therapeutic change. These simple yet clinically elegant exercises, through the use of the youth’s own internal metaphors, will cultivate increased self-awareness and encourage patients to experiment with different ways of thinking, feeling and being. Through symbolic representation, help your patients overcome blocks caused by cognitive defenses and language traps to keep them moving toward treatment goals of improved self-regulation, coping, and healing. 101 Arts-Based Activities to Get Children and Adolescents Talking is useful within moments after picking it up, due to the simple, organized way that each exercise is described, followed by a brief case example for use in both a younger and older child.” —Jenna Saul, MD, DFAACAP, CEDS, Clinical Assistant Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Psychiatry “I support this book and activities as a way to help vulnerable children cope with trauma and regain lost hope.” —Estomih Mduma, Haydom Global Health Research Centre at Haydom Lutheran Hospital, Manyara, Tanzania of related interest More Creative Coping Skills for Children Activities, Games, Stories, and Handouts to Help Children Self-regulate Bonnie Thomas ISBN 978 1 78592 021 9 eISBN 978 1 78450 267 6 Creative Coping Skills for Children Emotional Support through Arts and Crafts Activities Bonnie Thomas ISBN 978 1 84310 921 1 eISBN 978 1 84642 954 5 The Big Book of EVEN MORE Therapeutic Activity Ideas for Children and Teens Inspiring Arts-Based Activities and Character Education Curricula Lindsey Joiner ISBN 978 1 84905 749 3 eISBN 978 1 78450 196 9 The Big Book of Therapeutic Activity Ideas for Children and Teens Inspiring Arts-Based Activities and Character Education Curricula Lindsey Joiner ISBN 978 1 84905 865 0 eISBN 978 0 85700 447 5 The Expressive Arts Activity Book A Resource for Professionals Suzanne Darley and Wende Heath Foreword by Gene D. Cohen MD, PhD ISBN 978 1 84310 861 0 eISBN 978 1 84642 737 4 Focusing and Calming Games for Children Mindfulness Strategies and Activities to Help Children to Relax, Concentrate and Take Control Deborah M. Plummer Illustrated by Jane Serrurier ISBN 978 1 84905 143 9 eISBN 978 0 85700 344 7 WORKING WITH SEVERE TRAUMA, ABUSE AND NEGLECT USING FOUND AND EVERYDAY OBJECTS DAWN D’AMICO, LCSW, PhD Jessica Kingsley Publishers London and Philadelphia First published in 2017 by Jessica Kingsley Publishers 73 Collier Street London N1 9BE, UK and 400 Market Street, Suite 400 Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA www.jkp.com Copyright © Dawn D’Amico 2017 Front cover image source: Jennifer Laack. The cover image is for illustrative purposes only, and any person featuring is a model. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any material form (including photocopying, storing in any medium by electronic means or transmitting) without the written permission of the copyright owner except in accordance with the provisions of the law or under terms of a licence issued in the UK by the Copyright Licensing Agency Ltd. www.cla.co.uk or in overseas territories by the relevant reproduction rights organization, for details see www.ifrro.org. Applications for the copyright owner’s written permission to reproduce any part of this publication should be addressed to the publisher. Warning: The doing of an unauthorized act in relation to a copyright work may result in both a civil claim for damages and criminal prosecution. Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Names: D’Amico, Dawn, author. Title: 101 mindful arts-based activities to get children and adolescents talking : working with severe trauma, abuse and neglect using found and everyday objects / Dawn D’Amico. Other titles: Mindful arts-based activities to get children and adolescents talking | One hundred and one mindful arts-based activities to get children and adolescents talking Description: London ; Philadelphia : Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2017. Identifiers: LCCN 2016038350 | ISBN 9781785927317 (alk. paper) Subjects: | MESH: Stress Disorders, Traumatic--therapy | Child Abuse--therapy | Mindfulness--methods | Art Therapy--methods | Adolescent | Case Reports Classification: LCC RJ506.P66 | NLM WM 172.5 | DDC 618.92/8521065156-dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016038350 British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library ISBN 978 1 78592 731 7 eISBN 978 1 78450 422 9 I would like my book dedicated to Agatha. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This book is especially for Agatha. And to all of the other children, adolescents and their families, including Jessica and her children, who, like the fabled Phoenix, rose from pain to triumph. Thank you Kay: Your encouragement, clear thinking and support were invaluable. Thank you, Dr. Chandler Screven—in memory, I hope you are proud. This work was also lovingly supported by the ones with four paws: one continuously snoring at my feet, one in my lap at the computer, purring and making edits as she deems necessary, and finally one weaving through my feet. Last but not least, to Lisa, Sarah, Danielle and Alex—thank you for giving me a chance! You have no idea how you change lives. Thank you ALL! CONTENTS P r e fa c e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Use of This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Part 1 Self-Expression Life Story Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magnifying Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fighter Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Are You Dragging Around or into Your World? . . . . Wish Upon a Star 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Love Being Me . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memory Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pie Chart of Emotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draw a Brain or a Circle to Represent the Head . . . . . . . Feelings Word Game 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heart Now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Color Is Your World? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Color Do You Feel Today? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Confusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pictures of Self . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upside, Downside, Inside, Outside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Birthday Clock 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Birthday Clock 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 40 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 Cloudy Faces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sunny Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cloudy Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Animal Kingdom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . When I Was Young . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blue, Yellow, Purple, Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What I Want . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Else? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Special Time for Me . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clarifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaleidoscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tornado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 61 63 64 66 68 70 71 73 74 76 78 80 82 Part 2 Coping Umbrella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snail Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seashells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nerve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turning Back the Hands of Time 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turning Back the Hands of Time 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full Body Trace 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full Body Trace 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feelings Word Game 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open and Closed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comfort/Soothe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Safe and Unsafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . When Do You Feel Like a Lion? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pillow/Blanket—Soft/Cozy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stone—Bumpy/Rough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 89 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 Inside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slay Your Dragon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orange Cone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Container . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tightrope Walker 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tightrope Walker 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Birthday Balloons 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ball of Yarn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ouch! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Help! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lifelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightmares and Daydreams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boulders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Times I Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Putting Things in Their Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rocker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hiding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Storms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ringing the Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Time When My Heart Was Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 128 130 132 134 136 138 140 142 144 146 147 148 149 151 153 155 157 159 161 163 165 167 168 170 Part 3 Positive Thinking Mask of Me × 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Treasure Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Green Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clean the Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garden of Grief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garden of Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wish Upon a Star 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Make Yourself a Star . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 179 182 184 186 188 190 192 Luck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Happiness Looks Like . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magic Wand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feathers—Tickle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lotus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Key to Open the Heart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pandora’s Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bird’s Wing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Birthday Balloons 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remember When? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My Family/My Caregivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 196 198 200 202 204 206 208 210 212 213 215 216 218 220 E p i l og u e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 PREFACE As we know, severely traumatized children and adolescents have difficulty opening up, feeling safe and talking about trauma, yet this is our goal. In order to achieve this goal, we need to establish rapport, safety and support so that these children and adolescents can begin to open up and tell their stories. Without their input we cannot help them. Therefore, opening up and the subsequent information gathering is critical. It is the first step in the therapeutic relationship and it is the most difficult step, especially with this population. The techniques herein will allow the child/adolescent to open up and will allow you to collect the information. 13 INTRODUCTION This book is designed to help clinicians, teachers, aid workers and students who are working with children and adolescents aged 5–17 who have experienced serious trauma, such as sexual abuse, physical abuse, removal from the home, child pornography or sex trafficking. There is an assumption that the individuals using this book will have a knowledge and understanding of trauma. Many of these children and adolescents are more closed or withdrawn than children and adolescents who are dealing with less traumatic issues, such as divorce, or adjustment issues, such as moving to a new home. The issue of serious trauma is becoming more prevalent and requires new and progressive techniques, for which traditional therapy and play therapy is less effective. The new techniques in this book allow children and adolescents who have endured crisis and trauma to open up so that therapy can be initiated and better focused. It is common for a clinician or student to work with children and adolescents whose trauma level is so significant that they cannot talk. They are afraid. They have told so many people already—the first person they talked to for help, police, court systems, family—and now yet another person: you. This is a daunting task for clinicians. The brain does not always recognize the difference between remembering and retelling and actually being there. So it can be indeed a fear-filled, apprehensive undertaking on the part of both parties. As clinicians and students, we never quite know the extent of the abuse that we are about to hear. I remember in my own practice when I had a case file several inches thick. I knew the situation was grave: several young children, all siblings under the age of ten, had been sexually molested by their 14-year-old brother. It was a difficult situation to work with the children and parents, who were not eating and not sleeping, and 15 101 Mindful Arts-Based Activities to Get Children and Adolescents Talking who had already told the story to a forensic team, parents, social workers, etc. How do you start? Where do you start? How do you make this OK for them and for you? I created the techniques in this book to allow for children and adolescents to be “present” or “mindful” in the moment with me. I used objects with which children and adolescents could easily identify. I did this by utilizing “green” items. These items are timeless and recyclable. Timeless materials are also easy for parents and grandparents to understand and use. Recycling saves on every front. This book also is designed to help practitioners, who often become discouraged, burned out or reluctant to approach such clients. The fact is, many practitioners are lost within the first five years of working with this population. They are burned out and they leave—not necessarily the profession but this population. The techniques in this book can restore interest and motivation in the clinician and alleviate some of the stress that the clinician feels in these highly emotionally charged sessions. Who can forget the smell of markers, the feel of glue or paint, the sparkle of glitter? Easy-to-find objects, such as feathers, balloons, shells and paper, create a mini-footprint with a low impact on the environment and are accessible for everyone. That is what you will find here. This book was developed based on 22 years of work with children and families in a clinical setting. It has been written to provide new techniques, which are much needed as we see a rise in child sexual  abuse, child pornography and child sex trafficking, as well as physical abuse and neglect. All case studies in this book are anonymized. Working with children and adolescents is both an honor and a privilege. True trust comes when parents and caregivers bring us their children and adolescents. To my colleagues and students, here is new help for working with these children and adolescents. The children, adolescents and families we work with have been through a great deal of pain. This book uses recycled and green items to move children and adolescents through pain to a place of healing and growth—to the present, mindful and safe. 16 USE OF THIS BOOK This book is developmentally appropriate for children and adolescents aged 5–17. All tools can be used in both individual and group formats. All tools can be completed in an individual session except Mask of Me × 3, which will take three sessions. All tools will help children and adolescents to open up and the clinician to gather information. Many of the children and families that clinicians encounter have experienced multiple traumas.  It is with this knowledge that we recognize that some children have gaps in memory due to abuse or neglect. This book contains useful techniques for bridging memory gaps—for example, Green Flash. As children and adolescents begin to tell their stories, a sudden memory may occur or they may share memories they have been carrying with them. Another example is the Life Story Book. An opportunity to express a life story, even if a child can’t remember segments, or has memory gaps, can be thrilling and allow for the building of positive feelings and feelings of safety. All children and adolescents have a life story, even if a limited one. It is his or her story and should be embraced in the places where it can be supported, and healed in the places where it hurts. Everyone learns in different ways. As we get to know the children and adolescents we work with, we may find that they learn better using one sense than another. In the different types of activities in this book, using the different senses allows for a fuller and deeper understanding of the concept for the child or adolescent. Tactile activities are activities that children, adolescents and clinicians use to connect with our sense of touch. We will be using many recycled and found items here. 17 101 Mindful Arts-Based Activities to Get Children and Adolescents Talking Visual activities are activities in which children, adolescents and clinicians use sight or illustrations to help convey the message or the skill, such as coping. Verbal activities are activities in which children, adolescents and clinicians use only words to convey the message or concept. We do not need any recycled or found items. Try out different types of activities and determine which is the style the child or adolescent you are working with needs. This book is easy to use. Simply choose the section you need and choose a technique. You will find directions to implement the technique, including questions that the clinician may ask or that the client or family members may discuss or reflect upon. Each technique is followed by two short examples. The first case sample represents a younger child; the second case sample represents an adolescent. General art supplies are limited only by your imagination! Have on hand: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • lots of recycled cardboard glue washable paints finger paints markers glitter construction paper poster board feathers beads stones shells pretend “jewels” ink pad stamp of holding hands or shaking hands ribbon foil list of “feeling words” and emotions or flashcards of same stickers of happy, scary or sad faces and stickers of ocean creatures • everyday objects, such as umbrellas, small mirrors and whistles, also are useful. 18

Author Dawn D’Amico Isbn 9781785927317 File size 3MB Year 2016 Pages 224 Language English File format PDF Category Family and Friendship Book Description: FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrDiggMySpaceShare Many children who have experienced serious trauma are withdrawn and closed off, making it difficult to engage with them in therapy effectively. This book offers a compendium of therapeutic activities that will help children who have endured painful abuse to open up, so that they can learn to express their feelings and therapy can be directed towards their individual needs. From useful techniques for bridging memory gaps to using masks for self-expression, the innovative activities use mindfulness, art and play to help children feel relaxed and responsive. The activities require very little preparation, and use only everyday items that are easy to access and can be used time and time again. Case studies throughout offer a helpful demonstration of how the activities work in practice. This is an ideal resource for use with children in therapeutic, home and school settings. It is appropriate to use with children aged 5-17 who have experienced trauma, physical abuse, sexual abuse, forced migration and severe neglect, as well as those with acute depression, anxiety and behavioural difficulties.     Download (3MB) Narrative Therapies with Children and Their Families Understanding Children: Foundations for Quality, 3 edition Reading Stories with Young Children Not My Kid: What Parents Believe about the Sex Lives of Their Teenagers Fine Motor Skills for Children With Down Syndrome: A Guide for Parents And Professionals, 2 edition Load more posts

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